Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister to attend Arab League Summit | News

Prince Faisal bin Farhan will signify the crown prince, who was suggested by docs to keep away from journey.

Saudi Arabia’s overseas minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan will probably be representing the dominion on the upcoming Arab League Summit on behalf of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who was suggested by docs to keep away from journey, the Royal Court docket has stated.

The royal medical crew on Sunday really useful that the crown prince, also referred to as MBS, “keep away from long-distance flights” because of the doable influence of air strain on his ear, in line with a statement printed by the courtroom.

The crown prince in a name on Saturday had apologised to Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune for not with the ability to take part within the summit slated to happen in Algeria on November 1 – the primary for the reason that COVID-19 pandemic – in line with Arabic and French media stories.

The Arab League, based in 1945, represents 22 nations throughout the Center East and North Africa, although Syria has been suspended amid its long-running struggle. Whereas unified within the name for the Palestinians to have an unbiased state, the physique has in any other case been largely fractious and unable to implement its mandates.

MBS, who has risen to energy below his 86-year-old father King Salman was appointed crown prince in 2017, changing Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, a once-powerful determine as head of Saudi Arabia’s counterterrorism efforts and an in depth ally of the USA.

His rise to energy has seen the dominion endure speedy adjustments, reminiscent of permitting girls to drive and opening film theatres whereas loosening the grip of ultraconservatives.

He additionally launched a purported corruption crackdown that focused the richest males within the kingdom and led an internationally criticised Arab coalition that intervened militarily in Yemen – the poorest Arab nation.

US intelligence providers have linked Prince Mohammed to the 2018 killing and dismemberment of Washington Publish columnist Jamal Khashoggi. The dominion has denied the prince was concerned and a Saudi courtroom tried eight defendants for the homicide, handing them long-term jail sentences in 2020.

Just lately, the prince has come below intense US criticism over an oil manufacturing reduce by the Saudi-led OPEC cartel.

Photos: ‘250,000’ attend Laylat al-Qadr prayers at Al-Aqsa | Gallery News

Islamic authorities in Jerusalem say 250,000 individuals gathered to attend prayers on the Al-Aqsa Mosque to mark Laylat al-Qadr, because the holy month of Ramadan continues.

The trustworthy congregated on the mosque, one in all Islam’s holiest websites, on Wednesday night, near the golden-topped Dome of the Rock. Muslims consider the Prophet Muhammad ascended to heaven from the positioning.

Laylat al-Qadr, or Evening of Energy, is believed by Muslims to be the evening the primary verses of the Quran had been revealed to the Prophet Muhammad. Laylat al-Qadr is alleged to fall on one of many odd nights of the final 10 days of Ramadan, with the precise evening unknown, though it’s generally believed to be the twenty seventh.

Worshippers gathered amid heightened tensions between Israel and the Palestinians following a string of lethal assaults inside Israel, arrest raids within the West Financial institution and assaults by Israeli police on Palestinians at Jerusalem’s most delicate holy website.

No incidents had been reported on Wednesday evening.

The Al-Aqsa Mosque compound can also be revered by Jews because the Temple Mount. They predominantly worship on the Wailing Wall, often known as the Buraq Wall in Arabic.

‘150,000 Palestinians’ attend Friday prayers at Al-Aqsa Mosque | Israel-Palestine conflict News

The third Friday prayers of Ramadan on the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound in occupied East Jerusalem had been sandwiched by Israeli police attacks on Palestinians attending prayers, however that didn’t cease some 150,000 Palestinians travelling to the mosque to worship, in keeping with the Jerusalem Islamic Waqf.

Israeli forces raided the mosque on Friday after daybreak prayers, injuring not less than 31 Palestinians, together with three journalists, with rubber-coated bullets, stun grenades and tear gasoline. Israeli police mentioned the raids had been in response to Palestinians throwing rocks. Tear gasoline was additionally fired after Friday prayers, hitting Palestinians worshipping on the Dome of the Rock contained in the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound.

Settler incursions below police safety during the past week through the Jewish pageant of Passover had led to day by day confrontations with Palestinians on the mosque, with many injured and arrested.

On the primary day of Passover, April 15, Israeli forces injured not less than 158 Palestinians and arrested 400 others contained in the compound. Dozens extra had been injured and arrested all through the week.

Regardless of fears of issues escalating on the bottom, Palestinians have mentioned that their continued presence at Al-Aqsa is crucial.

“I feel it’s crucial for folks to return to Jerusalem and to Al-Aqsa. You are feeling belonging, you are feeling duty in the direction of Jerusalem, to show our kids that that is our land, that Al-Aqsa is our faith,” Rana Mohammad advised Al Jazeera on the compound.

The 36-year-old mom hails from Nablus within the occupied West Financial institution, and got here to East Jerusalem along with her husband and her five-year-old son.

Ramadan represents a uncommon alternative for Palestinians from the occupied West Financial institution – whereas Palestinian Jerusalemites and people with Israeli passports can entry Al-Aqsa at any time, Palestinians dwelling within the occupied West Financial institution are solely allowed to enter the town with a difficult-to-obtain navy allow outdoors of Ramadan.

“We can not come on regular days, so that you anticipate this second minute by minute. The sensation of being right here is indescribable – you are feeling that your spirit is rejuvenated,” mentioned Mohammad.

Palestinian worshippers at Al-Aqsa
Rana got here to Al-Aqsa along with her son from Nablus [Al Jazeera]

Flashpoint

Whereas Passover has ended and entrance into the mosque can be restricted to Muslims over the past 10 days of Ramadan, tensions on the bottom in Jerusalem and within the occupied West Financial institution stay excessive.

An increase in assaults by Palestinians inside Israel led to the killing of 14 Israelis in three weeks. In the meantime, Israelis have killed not less than 43 Palestinians for the reason that starting of 2022.

Weeks of protests and raids by Israeli forces on Al-Aqsa throughout Ramadan final yr escalated right into a widespread rebellion throughout Israel and the occupied Palestinian territories, and an 11-day assault on the besieged Gaza Strip.

The Al-Aqsa Mosque Compound has been a significant flashpoint between the Israeli occupation and Palestinians for many years, and was the epicentre of the 2000-2005 Palestinian Intifada, or rebellion.

The 14-hectare compound is among the holiest in Islam, and homes the Al-Qibli Mosque (Al-Aqsa Mosque) and the Dome of the Rock.

Aya Abu Moussa, a 33-year-old from al-Lydd (Lod) inside Israel, mentioned whereas she and her household are scared of the political state of affairs, they consider you will need to come to Al-Aqsa.

“There have to be a lot of Palestinians at Al-Aqsa – we can not go away it alone, in any respect. We see what occurs to the youth right here, we can not go away them alone,” Abu Moussa advised Al Jazeera, in reference to confrontations on the mosque. “The extra people who come – the extra they [Israel] can be afraid of raiding it. If there’s no person to dam them, they are going to get too comfy. The youth are limiting them,” she continued.

Based on Abu Moussa, 5 giant buses go away the cities of al-Lydd and al-Ramle (Ramla), in central Israel, every single day in Ramadan for daybreak and night time prayers at Al-Aqsa.

“Ever since final yr’s rebellion in al-Lydd, there was extra consciousness, particularly amongst youth, of the significance of coming to Al-Aqsa and Jerusalem. We thought they’d simply preserve taking part in PUBG, however no,” she mentioned, referring to a preferred laptop recreation.

Yasmeen Tibi, a 21-year-old from Nablus within the occupied West Financial institution, echoed an identical sentiment.

“Our energy is in numbers,” the college pupil advised Al Jazeera. “Those that are in a position to come, ought to come. Each particular person makes a distinction, even when we don’t realise it.”

Tibi got here to Al-Aqsa along with her 5 sisters and her 5 feminine cousins, all donning conventional Palestinian thobes and a keffiyeh.

“We shouldn’t be afraid – we’re the rightful homeowners of this land. They’re those who must be afraid,” she mentioned.

Palestinians from the West Financial institution should cross overcrowded checkpoints and anticipate hours earlier than being allowed to enter Jerusalem. Tibi mentioned that she and her household had left Nablus at 7am and reached Al-Aqsa at 10am, in a journey that was extra exhausting that it wanted to be.

“They handled us like cattle on the checkpoint. Everybody was positioned in small rows and squished collectively. We spent two hours inside Qalandiya checkpoint simply ready in line to cross by,” Tibi mentioned, referring to the primary checkpoint between the West Financial institution and East Jerusalem.

Israel has mentioned the measures are mandatory for safety causes.

Palestinian worshippers at Al-Aqsa
Aya Abu Moussa travelled to occupied East Jerusalem from al-Lydd, inside Israel [Al Jazeera]

Discovering a approach in

Whereas ladies of all ages are allowed to enter with out a navy allow on Fridays this Ramadan, solely males over 50 or boys below 12 years previous got an identical privilege.

Males and boys who didn’t match these standards had been both pressured to use for a navy allow with no assure of acquiring one, or discovered different methods to enter.

Mohammad, 20, jumped off the eight-metre-high (26-foot-high) Israeli separation wall to make it to Al-Aqsa.

Regardless of the heightened Israeli safety measures, Mohammed managed to make it by together with a number of of his pals. “I got here to hope, and to defend Al-Aqsa from the [Israeli] occupation,” Mohammed, who hailed from the Aqabet Jaber refugee camp in Jericho, advised Al Jazeera.

“Each Palestinian should come right here, as a result of the occupation raids the mosque, they hearth tear gasoline and ladies are crushed right here.”

“We’re pressured to confront them [Israel]. That is our land, and the Palestinian folks will persevere till liberation.”

In the meantime, Mohammad Asaad Saeed, a 57-year-old man from Tulkarem within the northern occupied West Financial institution, mentioned the dearth of management is what results in confrontations.

“We’d like somebody to guide us – to liberate Al-Aqsa,” Saeed advised Al Jazeera.

“The Palestinians are defenceless. What the youth do in confrontations – that is what must be achieved by a whole military, not our younger males. The issue is in our leaders.”

INTERACTIVE_AL AQSA_TIMELINE5-01
[Al Jazeera]

US officials attend migration summit while policies under fire | Migration News

Guatemala Metropolis, Guatemala – Prime United States officers are in Panama for a summit on migration within the Americas, the place migrant rights teams say US policies exacerbate the risks confronted by migrants and asylum seekers heading north.

The US secretaries of state and homeland safety are becoming a member of their counterparts from 20 different international locations within the western hemisphere for a ministerial conference on migration on Tuesday and Wednesday in Panama Metropolis.

“The US delegation will deepen our ongoing efforts to enhance bilateral and regional cooperation on irregular migration and compelled displacement, and lay the groundwork for a profitable Summit of the Americas in June,” the State Division said on Tuesday.

Nevertheless, migrant rights advocates contend that safety and deterrence policies pushed by the US and different vacation spot international locations worsen the dangers migrants and asylum seekers face in transit by way of the area.

“The US authorities has been so centered on enforcement,” mentioned Kennji Kizuka, affiliate director for refugee safety analysis and evaluation at Human Rights First, a US non-profit group. “That has compelled many asylum seekers to take extra harmful routes,” he advised Al Jazeera.

‘Holistic response’

Excessive-level dialogue on the convention this week will pursue a “holistic response to the challenges irregular migration generates all through our continent”, Panama’s Ministry of Overseas Affairs mentioned in an announcement on Sunday.

Multilateral banks, non-governmental organisations and worldwide establishments – together with the United Nations refugee company (UNHCR) – are additionally taking part within the ministerial convention.

A couple of-fifth of the estimated 82.4 million folks forcibly displaced on the planet are within the Americas, mentioned William Spindler, UNHCR’s spokesman for Latin America and the Caribbean.

“The simplest and sustainable technique to realize the stabilisation of populations on the transfer is to put money into regularisation and integration processes,” Spindler advised Al Jazeera by way of e-mail.

“An instance is the granting by Colombia of a temporary protection status for a period of 10 years to all Venezuelans residing in its territory,” he mentioned.

UNHCR representatives attending the ministerial convention will even spotlight the significance of regional coordination mechanisms and engagement with worldwide and personal sector actors to handle the basis causes of displacement.

“At a time when the eye of the world is concentrated on the crisis in Ukraine, it is very important keep in mind that there are different conditions that additionally deserve and want the political dedication and assets of the worldwide group,” mentioned Spindler.

Harmful journeys

Panama made repeated requires worldwide assist final yr to bolster humanitarian help efforts in the Darien region, the place migrants and asylum seekers from dozens of nations enter from Colombia and stroll for days by way of the jungle.

River crossings, publicity and armed teams all pose severe risks to folks transiting the world. At the least 51 folks have been reported lacking or lifeless final yr, in line with UNHCR.

The overwhelming majority of the greater than 133,000 migrants who crossed by way of the Darien area in 2021 have been of Haitian origin or descent, in line with Panamanian authorities information. However the sample has since shifted.

Venezuela is now the highest nationality of migrants transiting the Darien. Of the 13,425 migrants and asylum seekers recorded within the area over the primary three months of this yr, 4,257 have been Venezuelans, already far surpassing that nation’s whole in 2021.

Since taking workplace in January final yr, US President Joe Biden’s administration has centered on what it calls addressing “the root causes” of migration from Central America, as kids and households have been arriving on the nation’s southern border with Mexico in giant numbers.

Biden has additionally continued past US administrations’ pressure on Mexico – and to a rising extent now additionally Guatemala – to cease migrants and asylum seekers earlier than they attain the border.

The stress on Mexico to clamp down on migrants and asylum seekers transiting north possible performed a task within the enhance within the Darien area, in line with Kizuka. “Mexico was pushed by the USA to impose a visa restriction on Venezuelans,” he mentioned. “The US has pushed extra folks by way of Panama, by way of the Darien Hole.”

Mexico instated a visa requirement for Venezuelans in January, following suspensions late final yr of visa exemptions for nationals of Ecuador and Brazil. As of this month, Colombians should preregister on-line to enter Mexico.

US southern border

The US additionally instantly locations migrants and asylum seekers in hurt’s manner by proscribing entry to asylum by way of insurance policies at its southern border, in line with rights teams. The way forward for a few of these insurance policies is unsure.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the administrations of Donald Trump and now Joe Biden have summarily carried out more than 1.7 million expulsions on the nation’s southern border on fiercely contested public well being grounds, utilizing what is called “Title 42”.

Human Rights First has discovered almost 10,000 instances of kidnapping, sexual assault, torture and violence in opposition to folks in Mexico blocked or expelled by the US resulting from using Title 42 by the Biden administration. Folks expelled to different international locations usually face related dangers.

Cinthia, an asylum seeker from Honduras, deliberate to request safety within the US however was expelled underneath Title 42 earlier than she obtained the possibility, after making it throughout the border. She mentioned she faces demise threats in her house nation from armed extortionists.

“All of the governments speak about supporting migrants however they do the other,” she advised Al Jazeera, requesting her final identify not be used for safety causes.

Using Title 42 is presently set to end on Might 23, however court docket action, Congress or the administration itself may change that course. “There are indicators of pressure inside the Democratic Get together round what to do with Title 42,” mentioned Kizuka.

“That is considered as a political difficulty,” he mentioned. “The administration, it looks like, is making coverage choices based mostly on election prospects for the midterms.”