Biden plans to expand benefits to help end hunger in the US | Joe Biden News

About 10 p.c of American households in 2021 suffered meals insecurity, in keeping with the Meals and Drug Administration.

The Biden administration is laying out its plan to fulfill an formidable objective of ending starvation in america by 2030, together with increasing month-to-month advantages that assist low-income Individuals purchase meals.

The administration, in a plan launched Tuesday, additionally sought to extend wholesome consuming and bodily exercise in order that fewer individuals are with diabetes, weight problems, hypertension and different diet-related illnesses. It stated it might work to develop Medicaid and Medicare entry to weight problems counselling and diet.

“The results of meals insecurity and diet-related illnesses are vital, far reaching, and disproportionately impression traditionally underserved communities,” Biden wrote in a memo outlining the White Home technique. “But, meals insecurity and diet-related illnesses are largely preventable, if we prioritize the well being of the nation.”

Biden is internet hosting a convention this week on starvation, diet and well being, the primary by the White Home since 1969. That convention, beneath President Richard Nixon, was a pivotal second that influenced the US meals coverage agenda for 50 years. It led to a enormously expanded meals stamps programme and gave rise to the Ladies, Infants and Youngsters programme, which serves half the infants born within the US by offering girls with parenting recommendation, breastfeeding help and meals help.

Noreen Springstead, government director of the anti-hunger organisation WhyHunger, stated the whole-of-government nature of the summit will hopefully produce better alignment throughout the a number of federal companies that cope with starvation points — from the USDA and Well being and Human Providers to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. That, ideally, would assist Biden “set the North Star that nutritious meals is a human proper for all individuals”.

Springstead famous {that a} actually complete strategy to starvation and diet must embrace a significant dedication from charities and philanthropic foundations. It might additionally probably embrace elevating baseline salaries and employers paying their employees “wages which are livable in order that they’re not standing in a meals line”.

‘An finish to starvation’

Over time, cuts to federal programmes coupled with stigmas about welfare and large modifications to how meals and farming methods are run have prompted declines in entry to meals.

Biden, a Democrat, is hoping this week’s convention is equally transformative. However the objective of Nixon, a Republican, additionally was “to place an finish to starvation in America forever”.

And but 10 p.c of US households in 2021 suffered meals insecurity, that means they have been unsure they might get sufficient meals to feed themselves or their households as a result of they lacked cash or assets for meals, in keeping with the Meals and Drug Administration.

 

People receive donations at a food pantry in Columbus, Ohio, U.S.
A very complete strategy to starvation would wish a increase in baseline salaries, specialists stated [File: Gaelen Morse/Reuters]

To succeed, Biden will want buy-in from the non-public sector and an more and more partisan Congress. Among the objectives sound paying homage to former first woman Michelle Obama’s Let’s Transfer initiative to deal with childhood weight problems and promote wholesome consuming. The convention additionally will spotlight the necessity for entry to raised, more healthy meals and train.

Biden stated in his memo that in the course of the previous 50 years, “we’ve discovered a lot extra about diet and the position that wholesome consuming performs in how our youngsters carry out within the classroom and about diet and its linkages to illness prevention.”

Beneath the White Home plan, Supplemental Vitamin Help Program eligibility could be expanded, youngsters would get higher entry to free meals, and summer season advantages could be prolonged to extra schoolkids. Such modifications would require congressional approval.

The opposite tenets of the technique included the event of recent meals packaging to truth-check the “wholesome” claims for some merchandise, increasing SNAP incentives to pick out fruit and veggies, offering extra programmes to encourage individuals to get outdoors and transfer, and boosting funding for analysis.

Biden says US forces would defend Taiwan from Chinese invasion | Conflict News

US president’s remarks newest signal of a shift away from coverage of strategic ambiguity towards self-ruled island.

United States President Joe Biden has mentioned US forces would defend Taiwan from a Chinese language invasion, the strongest indication but of a shift away from Washington’s decades-long coverage of strategic ambiguity towards the island democracy.

Requested in a tv interview whether or not the US navy would defend the self-governed island if China invaded, Biden mentioned it could if there “was an unprecedented assault.”

Requested to make clear additional, Biden confirmed that US personnel would come to the defence of Taiwan, not like in Ukraine, which Washington has given materials help and navy tools to repel Russia with out committing American troops.

Biden’s feedback are his newest to forged doubt on long-standing US coverage towards Taiwan enshrined in 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, which commits Washington to assist Taipei defend itself however stops wanting promising to supply troops or straight take part in any battle.

Throughout a visit to Japan in Might, Biden appeared to verify that he would use drive to defend Taiwan if it was attacked by China, describing the defence of the island as a “dedication we made”.

Whereas many observers have taken Biden’s feedback as signalling the top of strategic ambiguity towards Taiwan, White Home officers have repeatedly insisted that US coverage towards the island stays unchanged.

A White Home spokesperson mentioned that US coverage had not modified regardless of Biden’s newest remarks.

“The president has mentioned this earlier than, together with in Tokyo earlier this 12 months,” the spokesperson mentioned. He additionally made clear then that our Taiwan coverage hasn’t modified. That is still true.”

In his interview with CBS’ 60 Minutes, Biden reiterated that Washington doesn’t help Taiwanese independence and is dedicated to the “One-China” coverage, below which the US formally recognises Beijing however not Taipei.

Regardless of not formally recognising Taipei, Washington ranks amongst Taiwan’s strongest worldwide backers, and earlier this month agreed to promote $1.1bn in weaponry to the island.

China claims Taiwan as a province that have to be “reunified” with the mainland, by drive if obligatory, and has accused the US of disrupting regional stability and inspiring Taiwanese separatism.

After Biden’s feedback in Might, China’s overseas ministry warned that “nobody ought to underestimate the agency resolve, staunch will and powerful means of the Chinese language folks in defending nationwide sovereignty and territorial integrity”.

Matthew Kroenig, deputy director of the Atlantic Council’s Scowcroft Middle for Technique and Safety, mentioned Biden’s stance on defending Taiwan was “crystal clear.”

“So long as he’s president, US coverage is to defend Taiwan. That is the suitable coverage because it contributes to the deterrence of China and helps to information US navy planning,” Kroenig instructed Al Jazeera.

“I do suppose America has the abdomen for that battle. Hitler and imperial Japan guess that America didn’t have the abdomen for a battle within the run as much as WWII. How did that end up for them? Washington has an enormous strategic curiosity in sustaining peace and stability, and a free and open order, within the Indo-Pacific.”

Joe Biden arrives in London for Queen Elizabeth’s funeral | Politics News

US chief is anticipated to satisfy King Charles and pay tribute at Elizabeth’s coffin forward of Monday’s state funeral.

US President Joe Biden has arrived in London forward of Queen Elizabeth’s funeral.

He’s anticipated to pay tribute at her coffin on Sunday and can later be part of King Charles and dozens of different world leaders for a reception forward of Monday’s grand state funeral. 

Elizabeth’s physique has been mendacity in state on the historic Westminster Corridor since Wednesday, and folks from all walks of life and from around the globe have been submitting previous in a continuing, emotional stream, many queuing in a single day and a few for as much as 24 hours.

“Her legacy will loom giant within the pages of British historical past, and within the story of our world,” Biden stated in a message following information of the queen’s loss of life on September 8.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, who was seen curtsying to the coffin, are amongst dignitaries who’ve already paid their respects.

The UK has hosted a collection of poignant, carefully-choreographed ceremonies within the 10 days which have adopted Elizabeth’s passing, reflecting the traditions and pageantry of the British royal household whose lineage stretches again virtually 1,000 years.

On Saturday night, the queen’s eight grandchildren, together with Charles’s sons Princes William and Harry, held a solemn vigil at her coffin’s facet, following an analogous observance by her youngsters the day prior to this.

A minute of nationwide silence will probably be held at 8pm (1900 GMT) on Sunday.

State funeral

The royals and the British authorities at the moment are looking forward to Monday’s funeral at Westminster Abbey, the location of coronations, weddings and burials of English after which British kings and queens since William I in 1066.

London’s police power has described the ceremony as the largest safety operation it has ever undertaken.

Some 500 visitors representing almost 200 nations and territories will probably be attending – presidents, prime ministers, kings, queens and sultans amongst their quantity – and big crowds are anticipated to throng the streets.

The UK has not held a state funeral on the dimensions deliberate for the queen since that for World Struggle Two chief Winston Churchill.

The federal government stated massive screens to look at the ceremony could be arrange in Hyde Park in London and in cities throughout the nation.

The funeral may even be aired reside by three broadcasters.

Such has been the need to pay tribute to the favored monarch, the one one most Britons have recognized since her accession in 1952, that tens of 1000’s have waited patiently in a line stretching alongside the River Thames to spend just a few transient seconds together with her coffin.

By the point her mendacity in state ends on Monday, officers have estimated as many as 750,000 might have filed previous.

“She wouldn’t consider all this, she actually wouldn’t,” Prince William stated as he joined his father Charles, the brand new king, to talk to mourners ready in line. “It’s superb.”

Senate Democrats pass budget package, a major victory for Biden | Business and Economy News

Democrats pushed their election-year financial package deal to Senate passage, a hard-fought compromise much less bold than President Joe Biden’s authentic imaginative and prescient — however one that also meets deep-rooted occasion objectives of slowing local weather change, moderating pharmaceutical prices, and taxing large companies.

The package deal on Sunday heads subsequent to the Home the place legislators are poised to ship on Biden’s priorities, a shocking turnaround of what had appeared a misplaced and doomed effort that abruptly roared again to political life. Democrats held united, 51-50, with Vice President Kamala Harris casting the tie-breaking vote.

“It’s been an extended, robust and winding street, however ultimately, ultimately we’ve arrived,” mentioned Senate Majority Chief Chuck Schumer forward of ultimate votes.

“The Senate is making historical past. I’m assured the Inflation Discount Act will endure as one of many defining legislative measures of the twenty first century.”

Senators engaged in a round the clock marathon of voting that started Saturday and stretched late into Sunday. Democrats swatted down some three dozen Republican amendments designed to torpedo the laws.

Confronting unanimous opposition, Democratic unity within the 50-50 chamber held, protecting the occasion on monitor for a morale-boosting victory three months from elections when congressional management is at stake.

“I feel it’s gonna move,” Biden instructed reporters as he left the White Home early Sunday to go to Rehoboth Seashore, Delaware, ending his COVID-19 isolation.

The Home appeared seemingly to offer closing congressional approval when it returns briefly from the US summer season recess on Friday.

The invoice bumped into hassle noon over objections to the brand new 15 p.c company minimal tax that personal fairness corporations and different industries disliked, forcing last-minute adjustments.

Regardless of the momentary setback, the Inflation Discount Act provides Democrats a campaign-season showcase for motion on coveted objectives.

It contains the largest-ever federal effort on local weather change — near $400bn — caps out-of-pocket drug prices for seniors on Medicare to $2,000 a 12 months and extends expiring subsidies that assist 13 million folks afford medical health insurance. By elevating company taxes, the entire package deal is paid for with some $300bn in additional income for deficit discount.

Barely greater than one-tenth the scale of Biden’s preliminary 10-year, $3.5 trillion rainbow of progressive aspirations in his Construct Again Higher initiative, the brand new package deal abandons earlier proposals for common preschool, paid household depart, and expanded little one care assist. That plan collapsed after conservative Senator Joe Manchin, a Democrat, opposed it saying it was too expensive and would drive inflation.

Nonpartisan analysts have mentioned the Inflation Discount Act would have a minor impact on surging client costs.

Republicans mentioned the measure would undermine an economic system that policymakers are struggling to maintain from plummeting into recession. They mentioned the invoice’s enterprise taxes would harm job creation and pressure costs skyward, making it more durable for folks to deal with the nation’s worst inflation because the Nineteen Eighties.

“Democrats have already robbed American households as soon as by inflation, and now their resolution is to rob American households a second time,” Republican Senate Minority Chief Mitch McConnell argued.

He mentioned spending and tax will increase within the laws would get rid of jobs whereas having an insignificant impact on inflation and local weather change.

 

In an ordeal imposed on all price range payments corresponding to this one, the Senate needed to endure an in a single day “vote-a-rama” of rapid-fire amendments. Every examined Democrats’ skill to carry collectively a compromise negotiated by Schumer, progressives, Manchin and the inscrutable centrist Senator Kyrsten Sinema, a Democrat.

Sinema compelled Democrats to drop a plan to forestall rich hedge fund managers from paying lower than particular person revenue tax charges for his or her earnings.

Progressive Senator Bernie Sanders provided amendments to additional broaden the laws’s well being advantages, however these efforts have been defeated. Most votes have been compelled by Republicans, and lots of have been designed to make Democrats look delicate on US-Mexico border safety and gasoline and vitality prices, and like bullies for eager to strengthen IRS tax legislation enforcement.

The thrust of the pharmaceutical value language remained. That included letting Medicare negotiate what it pays for medication for its 64 million aged recipients, penalizing producers for exceeding inflation for prescribed drugs offered to Medicare, and limiting beneficiaries’ out-of-pocket drug prices to $2,000 yearly.

The measure’s closing prices have been being recalculated to replicate late adjustments, however general it could elevate greater than $700bn over a decade. The cash would come from a 15 p.c minimal tax on a handful of companies with yearly income above $1bn, a 1 p.c tax on corporations that repurchase their very own inventory, bolstered IRS tax collections, and authorities financial savings from decrease drug prices.

 

 

 

 

Joe Biden’s COVID-19 symptoms ‘have improved’, his doctor says | Joe Biden News

White Home doctor says US president is taking antiviral remedy, as his very important indicators stay ‘solely regular’.

US President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 signs “have improved”, his physician has stated, as his pulse, blood strain and oxygen ranges stay “solely regular”.

In a memo (PDF) launched by the White home on, Biden doctor, Keven O’Connor, stated the US president was experiencing a runny nostril, fatigue and “an occasional non-productive, now ‘unfastened’ cough”.

O’Connor additionally stated that Biden had a slight fever on Thursday night, nevertheless it responded “favorably” to a generic ache aid remedy. “His temperature has remained regular since then,” the physician’s memo reads.

Biden, who examined constructive for COVID on Thursday, is continuous to take the antiviral remedy Paxlovid, supposed to decrease threat of hospitalisation and demise for these most susceptible.  At 79 years previous, the president falls into that class, in keeping with the US Facilities for Illness Management and Prevention (CDC).

To take the Paxlovid, Biden has needed to cease taking two different medicines that decrease ldl cholesterol and blood strain. O’Connor stated Biden will cease taking these medicines throughout the course of Paxlovid remedy, often a five-day remedy, and “for a number of days after his final dose”. Throughout that point, the president will take “low dose aspirin instead kind of blood thinner”.

On Friday, the White Home launched a photo of Biden – masked at his desk – making a telephone name whereas taking a look at a paper be aware, with the caption: “President Biden continued working from the White Home this morning, together with talking by telephone together with his nationwide safety workforce.”

Biden and the White Home have careworn that the president is absolutely vaccinated and double-boosted for COVID, which lowers his threat of great sickness. Officers have taken the chance to encourage others to get the vaccine.

“Get vaccinated,” White Home COVID-19 response coordinator Ashish Jha advised reporters on Thursday. “You probably have a breakthrough an infection, get handled; it’s the perfect factor you are able to do to guard your self.”

The Biden administration has been urging Individuals to get vaccinated and boosted amid a spike in COVID instances, pushed by extremely contagious Omicron subvariants often known as BA.4 and BA.5.

“Staying updated in your COVID-19 vaccines offers the perfect safety in opposition to extreme outcomes,” CDC Director Rochelle Walensky stated earlier this month.

Regardless of the COVID analysis, Biden has continued to hold out his duties as president. On Thursday, he signed into legislation the “Method Act”, which goals to fight the infant components shortages that the US has been experiencing.

“I actually respect your inquiries and issues,” Biden stated in a video message on Thursday. “However I’m doing nicely, getting plenty of work executed, going to proceed to get it executed. And within the meantime, thanks to your concern and maintain the religion. It’s going to be OK.”

Biden struggles to define agenda ahead of visit to Saudi Arabia | Joe Biden News

Washington, DC – With the warfare in Ukraine resulting in a surge in petrol costs in the US and world wide, oil manufacturing will prime US President Joe Biden’s agenda when he visits Saudi Arabia later this month.

However Biden and his prime aides have shied away from acknowledging the worldwide power disaster is driving the go to. As a substitute, they’ve cited an array of points – from normalising ties with Israel, to ending the warfare in Yemen, coping with Iran, addressing local weather change and growing “counterterrorism” methods.

Analysts have mentioned this demonstrates Biden’s reluctance to interact with the Gulf kingdom amid human rights issues, in addition to his administration’s efforts to fend off criticism from lawmakers in Washington.

“It may very well be that the give attention to normalisation and attempting to stabilise or deliver peace to the area is a solution to attempt to shift the narrative over the go to to a extra politically pleasant terrain for the White Home,” mentioned Kristian Coates Ulrichsen, a Center East fellow at Rice College’s Baker Institute for Public Coverage.

Certainly, whereas many members of Biden’s Democratic Get together are sceptical of deepening ties with Riyadh, there’s practically unanimous consensus in Washington favouring increasing normalisation between Israel and Arab nations.

Invoking ‘peace’

On a number of events final month, Biden invoked Israel and “peace” within the area when requested about his go to to Saudi Arabia, even earlier than the journey was confirmed.

“It has to do with nationwide safety for them – for Israelis,” Biden informed reporters of the go to on June 13. “I’ve a programme, anyway. It has to do with a lot bigger points than having to do with the power piece.”

A day later, the White Home formally introduced that Biden will make a journey to Israel and Saudi Arabia between July 13 and 16. After weeks of hypothesis, US officers additionally confirmed that the president would meet with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, whom Washington had accused of ordering the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Riyadh has insisted that the killing of Khashoggi on the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in 2018 was a rogue operation that came about with out the approval or data of prime officers, together with bin Salman, who is named MBS.

Nonetheless, the dying of the Saudi journalist, who was a US resident and labored for the Washington Submit on the time of the killing, stirred sturdy condemnations towards the dominion in Washington, and far of the ire was directed at MBS. At a Democratic Get together presidential debate late in 2019, Biden – then a candidate – famously pledged to make Saudi Arabia a “pariah” when requested concerning the homicide.

Shibley Telhami, professor for peace and growth on the College of Maryland, mentioned there’s a political calculation behind Biden’s emphasis on normalisation between Israel and Arab states within the context of his Center East journey.

“He thinks the recognition of normalisation with Israel would maybe offset the negatives of showing with Mohammed bin Salman,” Telhami informed Al Jazeera.

However Telhami added that the US president is “miscalculating” as a result of whereas normalisation is in style amongst congressional Democrats, Democratic voters are “leaning extra in the direction of the Palestinians now than they’re in the direction of the Israelis”.

In the meantime, the Democratic rank and file opinion of Saudi Arabia stays “destructive”, he mentioned.

Mohmmed bin Salman
US President Joe Biden will meet Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman this month [File: Andrej Isakovic/Reuters]

Normalisation with Israel

For his half, Juan Cole, professor of historical past on the College of Michigan, mentioned selling normalisation with Israel upfront of the go to to Saudi Arabia suits with Biden’s help for Israel all through his profession but additionally occurs to be politically useful.

“I’m positive that when Biden says it’s partly about making peace for the sake of Israel and so forth nowadays, on the one hand, he’s taking part in to the pro-Israel vote in the US, however then again, I believe there’s one thing to it,” Cole informed Al Jazeera.

If the White Home’s public focus had been solely on oil, it might seem that Biden is “bowing to financial exigencies” and abandoning his “ethical stance” on relations with Riyadh, Cole added.

For now, it doesn’t seem that Biden will safe full diplomatic relations between Saudi Arabia and Israel throughout his go to. As a substitute, media studies from the US have predicted incremental normalisation, together with reaching an settlement on the switch of sovereignty on two Purple Sea islands from Egypt to Saudi Arabia, which might require Israeli consent.

Saudi officers have mentioned the dominion is dedicated to the 2002 Arab Peace initiative, which situations normalisation on establishing a viable Palestinian state.

Ulrichsen mentioned the Saudis could also be holding out for the “proper time” to normalise ties with Israel.

“It strikes me that the Saudi management has decided that the US wants them greater than they want the US at this second,” he mentioned.

“Maybe they’re holding out in a extra hardline posture to attempt to get extra concessions out of the administration – no matter they might be by way of arms gross sales or Yemen or political rehabilitation of the crown prince.

“And I would come with normalisation with Israel in that too, within the sense that the Saudis know they will play that card at a time of their selecting, however they will solely play it as soon as.”

Ulrichsen added that Biden is struggling to generate a transparent message spelling out the aims and the explanations for the go to.

“We nonetheless don’t see an outlined agenda or set of outcomes for what the administration hopes to realize,” Ulrichsen informed Al Jazeera.

Oil manufacturing

And though specialists agreed that oil manufacturing might be Biden’s dominant precedence in Saudi Arabia, White Home officers have pressured that the journey will handle a “large agenda” when he visits the dominion, and power is just one merchandise on it.

“To take a look at this journey because it being solely about oil, it might be merely improper to do this,” White Home spokeswoman Karine Jean-Pierre informed reporters final month.

Forward of the essential US midterm legislative elections in November, report petrol costs for American customers are contributing to Biden’s dwindling recognition.

Cole mentioned lowering oil costs is essential for Biden – domestically and by way of international coverage. He defined that whereas American and European sanctions on Russian gasoline exports after the invasion of Ukraine have damage Moscow, the measures made costs spiral, resulting in elevated revenues for the Russians from extra restricted gross sales.

He urged that if it weren’t for the oil challenge, Biden wouldn’t go to the dominion.

“I’m unsure he may have been satisfied to do that merely on these different grounds,” Cole mentioned. “It appears to me that petroleum is within the forefront, not just for Russia coverage, however in hopes that further Saudi manufacturing may cut back costs for Individuals customers.”

Jailed WNBA star Griner appeals to Biden: ‘Get me home’ | Basketball News

Basketball star Brittney Griner calls on US president to do all he can to safe her launch from Russian jail.

US basketball star Brittney Griner has appealed to President Joe Biden to do all he can to safe her launch from jail in Russia, saying in a letter that she is “terrified” she would possibly stay imprisoned eternally.

Representatives for Griner, a Ladies’s Nationwide Basketball Affiliation (WNBA) all-star and two-time Olympic gold medallist, launched excerpts of the letter on Monday, the identical day her agent Lindsay Kagawa Colas mentioned it was delivered to the White Home.

“As I sit right here in a Russian jail, alone with my ideas and with out the safety of my spouse, household, buddies, Olympic jersey, or any accomplishments, I’m terrified I is perhaps right here eternally,” Griner mentioned within the hand-written word.

“On the 4th of July, our household usually honors the service of those that fought for our freedom, together with my father who’s a Vietnam Struggle Veteran,” she added, referring to Independence Day in the US.

“It hurts desirous about how I normally have a good time this present day as a result of freedom means one thing utterly totally different to me this yr.”

Griner was arrested on the airport within the Russian capital in mid-February on fees of carrying vape cartridges that contained hashish oil in her baggage.

Her incarceration got here at a time of heightened tensions between Russia and the US over the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and the Biden administration has mentioned she is being “wrongfully detained”.

Griner’s trial started in Moscow on July 1. Two witnesses have been questioned by the prosecution: an airport customs official, who spoke in open court docket, and an unidentified witness in a closed session, in response to the state information company RIA-Novosti.

The trial was then adjourned, it mentioned, when two different witnesses didn’t present up, and the following session was set for July 7.

US Cost d’Affaires Elizabeth Rood instructed reporters on the trial that Griner instructed her she was “holding the religion” and that she was doing “in addition to may be anticipated”.

The Biden administration has beforehand mentioned it’s working to carry Griner and one other American, Michigan company safety govt Paul Whelan, house from Russia, and that their circumstances stay priorities.

In Monday’s letter, Griner urged Biden to make use of his powers to make sure her return.

“Please do all you possibly can to carry us house. I voted for the primary time in 2020 and I voted for you. I consider in you. I nonetheless have a lot good to do with my freedom you can assist restore,” she mentioned.

“I miss my spouse! I miss my household! I miss my teammates! It kills me to know they’re struggling a lot proper now. I’m grateful for no matter you are able to do at this second to get me house.”

Griner’s imprisonment has drawn requires motion from prime US athletes, together with her WNBA teammates, who met with US State Division officers in mid-June to push for her launch.

“We’re right here to do no matter we will to amplify and maintain BG on the forefront, which is extra vital than any basketball sport and the rest that’s occurring in our lives,” Phoenix Mercury star Diana Taurasi mentioned in a press release launched by the crew at the moment.

The WNBA Gamers Affiliation additionally known as for motion on Monday, saying on Twitter: “It’s fairly powerful having fun with a day meant to have a good time independence when one in every of our personal residents, Brittney Griner, is STILL wrongfully detained in Russia.”

‘Enough’: Biden tells lawmakers to pass gun control laws | Gun Violence News

In emotional speech, US president says it’s time for lawmakers to enact robust legal guidelines – together with a ban on assault weapons – to curb gun violence.

In an emotional speech broadcast stay on nationwide tv, United States President Joe Biden has known as on lawmakers to cross laws to curb gun violence within the nation, per week after 19 youngsters had been shot lifeless by a gunman of their college.

Biden proposed numerous legal guidelines, together with a ban on assault weapons, which was allowed to lapse beneath a Republican administration in 2004. Different proposals included a restrict on excessive capability magazines, safe storage legal guidelines, “pink flag” legal guidelines, common background checks and the removing of safety legal guidelines for gun producers.

“It’s time to behave,” Biden stated from the White Home. “For the kids we’ve got misplaced. For the kids we are able to save. For the nation we love. Let’s meet the second. It’s time to behave.”

The impassioned speech, broadcast throughout primetime within the US, adopted a sequence of mass shootings throughout the nation by which gunmen have focused Black individuals in Buffalo, schoolchildren in Uvalde and medical doctors in Tulsa.

Peppering his speech with declarations of “sufficient”, Biden stated too many locations within the US had develop into “killing fields”, and urged Republicans within the Senate to again modifications to laws that might make the nation safer for everybody.

Alluding to the mid-term elections later this 12 months, he stated gun management was a matter of “widespread sense” and careworn that the Second Modification, which gun proponents use to curb regulation, was not absolute.

Jason Nichols, a social and political analyst, on the College of Maryland, advised Al Jazeera that whereas he didn’t anticipate Republicans to decide to a ban on assault weapons, the November polls would possibly encourage them to undertake a few of Biden’s different proposals.

“After all we’ve got our kitchen desk points however essentially the most basic factor is life and if we aren’t doing the whole lot we are able to to guard life, I feel the American individuals will activate their politicians, significantly the Republican politicians who’ve been blocking this 12 months after 12 months,” he stated. “I’m inspired that that may inspire Republicans to make a transfer on this.”

Whereas Democrats at present management the Home of Representatives, the Senate is cut up with every celebration holding 50 seats. To ensure that any laws to cross, and to keep away from the filibuster, 10 Republican Senators would wish to vote in favour of it.

Republicans and a few Democrats have blocked harder gun regulation even after horrific mass shootings such because the homicide of 20 younger youngsters at a major college in Sandy Hook, Connecticut in 2012.

Whereas that assault surprised the nation and initially appeared as if it may be the atrocity that might galvanise motion on gun management, even watered down measures to increase federal background checks for these shopping for weapons did not cross the Republican-controlled Senate.

There was extra success on the state stage, with Connecticut increasing a ban on assault weapons, instituting common background checks, and banning high-capacity magazines.

Biden, Bolsonaro to hold first formal talks at regional summit | Politics News

US president will meet Brazilian counterpart on sidelines of Summit of the Americas, Biden administration official says.

United States President Joe Biden will maintain his first formal talks with Brazilian counterpart Jair Bolsonaro at subsequent week’s Summit of the Americas, a senior US official has stated, stressing the significance of the US-Brazil relationship.

Biden’s prime Latin America adviser, Juan Gonzalez, on Wednesday confirmed the 2 leaders would meet in Los Angeles.

After signalling he would possibly skip the summit, Bolsonaro stated final week that he would attend and meet Biden on the sidelines, regardless of what he referred to as a “freeze” in Brazil-US ties since Biden took workplace in January 2021.

Requested if Biden would increase issues about Bolsonaro’s questioning of Brazil’s voting system, Gonzalez stated solely that america “does believe in Brazil’s electoral establishments which have confirmed sturdy”.

Bolsonaro, a far-right populist and one of many final world leaders to acknowledge Biden’s presidential victory, for months has claimed with none proof that the nation’s digital voting system is inclined to fraud.

Judicial and different consultants have rejected the allegation, accusing the president of in search of to sow doubt forward of Brazil’s October elections in a bid to contest the outcomes – much like former US President Donald Trump, whom Bolsonaro has emulated.

Bolsonaro is going through a stiff problem from former left-wing President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who, current polls present, has a substantial lead within the race.

“The problem of the Brazilian elections is admittedly up for the Brazilians to resolve,” Gonzalez stated throughout a information convention to preview the summit agenda.

He stated talks between Biden and Bolsonaro would cowl a broad spectrum of bilateral and international points “given the significance of the US-Brazil relationship”.

“There’s a very lengthy checklist of points which are going to be up for dialogue,” Gonzalez stated.

The Biden administration is hoping to make use of the Summit of the Americas to construct a coalition to sort out urgent challenges within the area, most notably a surge in migration towards the US.

However Washington has confronted criticism within the lead-up to the assembly after it signalled that the governments of Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela have been unlikely to attend, citing their respective human rights data and different points.

That has thrown the attendance checklist into query.

Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has stated that he doesn’t wish to attend the summit until each nation within the area is invited, and it stays unclear if he’ll journey to Los Angeles.

“Is it going to be the Summit of the Americas or is it going to be the chums of America summit?” the Mexican chief stated on Friday.

Biden despatched his particular adviser for the assembly, former Senator Chris Dodd, to Brazil final week to persuade Bolsonaro to go to the gathering, which the US is internet hosting for the primary time since its inaugural session in 1994.

The provide of a bilateral assembly with Biden helped sway Bolsonaro, the Reuters information company reported, citing folks aware of the matter.

Biden tells ‘friend’ Kishida US is committed to Japan’s defence | International Trade News

US president’s two-day go to will culminate within the formal launch of an financial plan for deeper engagement in Asia.

President Joe Biden assured his “good pal” Prime Minister Fumio Kishida of Japan on Monday that the US is totally dedicated to Japan’s defence, amid simmering stress with China and the ramifications of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

The cornerstone of Biden’s two-day go to, which incorporates conferences with the leaders of Japan, India and Australia, within the “Quad” group, would be the launch of an Indo-Pacific Financial Framework, a broad plan offering an financial pillar for US engagement with Asia.

“The US-Japan alliance has lengthy been the cornerstone of peace and prosperity within the Indo-Pacific, and the US stays totally dedicated to Japan’s defence,” Biden mentioned firstly of talks with Kishida on the Akasaka Palace in central Tokyo.

Biden was greeted with a navy honour guard that performed the anthems of each international locations beneath a brilliant blue sky.

Earlier, he met Emperor Naruhito, speaking briefly on the palace entrance earlier than being ushered inside. The White Home mentioned Biden provided greetings on behalf of the American individuals, highlighting the energy of the US-Japan relationship anchored by deep people-to-people ties.

The 2 nations are anticipated to debate Japan’s plans to increase its navy capabilities and attain in response to China’s rising would possibly.

The allies are additionally anticipated to reconfirm their shut ties within the face of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, agreeing that unilateral adjustments to the established order by pressure are unacceptable.

Worries are rising in Asia about an more and more assertive China, notably in gentle of its shut ties to Russia, and stress particularly has been rising over self-ruled Taiwan, which China considers a renegade province.

North Korea and regional points may also be on the agenda, with Biden afterward Monday scheduled to fulfill households of Japanese who had been kidnapped years in the past to coach spies in North Korea.

However the centrepiece of the day might be Biden’s launch of the Indo-Pacific Financial Framework for Prosperity (IPEF), a programme to bind international locations extra carefully by frequent requirements in areas together with supply-chain resilience, clear power, infrastructure and digital commerce.

America has lacked an financial pillar to its Indo-Pacific engagement since former President Donald Trump withdrew from a multinational Trans-Pacific commerce settlement, leaving the sector open to China to increase its affect.

However the IPEF is unlikely to incorporate binding commitments, and Asian international locations and commerce consultants have given a decidedly lukewarm response to a programme restricted by Biden’s reluctance to threat American jobs by providing the elevated market entry the area craves.

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi is due in Japan for the Quad talks, with Australia’s new prime minister, Anthony Albanese, additionally anticipated.

Biden arrived in Japan late on Sunday from South Korea and can depart on Tuesday for the US.