‘Enough’: Biden tells lawmakers to pass gun control laws | Gun Violence News

In emotional speech, US president says it’s time for lawmakers to enact robust legal guidelines – together with a ban on assault weapons – to curb gun violence.

In an emotional speech broadcast stay on nationwide tv, United States President Joe Biden has known as on lawmakers to cross laws to curb gun violence within the nation, per week after 19 youngsters had been shot lifeless by a gunman of their college.

Biden proposed numerous legal guidelines, together with a ban on assault weapons, which was allowed to lapse beneath a Republican administration in 2004. Different proposals included a restrict on excessive capability magazines, safe storage legal guidelines, “pink flag” legal guidelines, common background checks and the removing of safety legal guidelines for gun producers.

“It’s time to behave,” Biden stated from the White Home. “For the kids we’ve got misplaced. For the kids we are able to save. For the nation we love. Let’s meet the second. It’s time to behave.”

The impassioned speech, broadcast throughout primetime within the US, adopted a sequence of mass shootings throughout the nation by which gunmen have focused Black individuals in Buffalo, schoolchildren in Uvalde and medical doctors in Tulsa.

Peppering his speech with declarations of “sufficient”, Biden stated too many locations within the US had develop into “killing fields”, and urged Republicans within the Senate to again modifications to laws that might make the nation safer for everybody.

Alluding to the mid-term elections later this 12 months, he stated gun management was a matter of “widespread sense” and careworn that the Second Modification, which gun proponents use to curb regulation, was not absolute.

Jason Nichols, a social and political analyst, on the College of Maryland, advised Al Jazeera that whereas he didn’t anticipate Republicans to decide to a ban on assault weapons, the November polls would possibly encourage them to undertake a few of Biden’s different proposals.

“After all we’ve got our kitchen desk points however essentially the most basic factor is life and if we aren’t doing the whole lot we are able to to guard life, I feel the American individuals will activate their politicians, significantly the Republican politicians who’ve been blocking this 12 months after 12 months,” he stated. “I’m inspired that that may inspire Republicans to make a transfer on this.”

Whereas Democrats at present management the Home of Representatives, the Senate is cut up with every celebration holding 50 seats. To ensure that any laws to cross, and to keep away from the filibuster, 10 Republican Senators would wish to vote in favour of it.

Republicans and a few Democrats have blocked harder gun regulation even after horrific mass shootings such because the homicide of 20 younger youngsters at a major college in Sandy Hook, Connecticut in 2012.

Whereas that assault surprised the nation and initially appeared as if it may be the atrocity that might galvanise motion on gun management, even watered down measures to increase federal background checks for these shopping for weapons did not cross the Republican-controlled Senate.

There was extra success on the state stage, with Connecticut increasing a ban on assault weapons, instituting common background checks, and banning high-capacity magazines.

Biden, Bolsonaro to hold first formal talks at regional summit | Politics News

US president will meet Brazilian counterpart on sidelines of Summit of the Americas, Biden administration official says.

United States President Joe Biden will maintain his first formal talks with Brazilian counterpart Jair Bolsonaro at subsequent week’s Summit of the Americas, a senior US official has stated, stressing the significance of the US-Brazil relationship.

Biden’s prime Latin America adviser, Juan Gonzalez, on Wednesday confirmed the 2 leaders would meet in Los Angeles.

After signalling he would possibly skip the summit, Bolsonaro stated final week that he would attend and meet Biden on the sidelines, regardless of what he referred to as a “freeze” in Brazil-US ties since Biden took workplace in January 2021.

Requested if Biden would increase issues about Bolsonaro’s questioning of Brazil’s voting system, Gonzalez stated solely that america “does believe in Brazil’s electoral establishments which have confirmed sturdy”.

Bolsonaro, a far-right populist and one of many final world leaders to acknowledge Biden’s presidential victory, for months has claimed with none proof that the nation’s digital voting system is inclined to fraud.

Judicial and different consultants have rejected the allegation, accusing the president of in search of to sow doubt forward of Brazil’s October elections in a bid to contest the outcomes – much like former US President Donald Trump, whom Bolsonaro has emulated.

Bolsonaro is going through a stiff problem from former left-wing President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who, current polls present, has a substantial lead within the race.

“The problem of the Brazilian elections is admittedly up for the Brazilians to resolve,” Gonzalez stated throughout a information convention to preview the summit agenda.

He stated talks between Biden and Bolsonaro would cowl a broad spectrum of bilateral and international points “given the significance of the US-Brazil relationship”.

“There’s a very lengthy checklist of points which are going to be up for dialogue,” Gonzalez stated.

The Biden administration is hoping to make use of the Summit of the Americas to construct a coalition to sort out urgent challenges within the area, most notably a surge in migration towards the US.

However Washington has confronted criticism within the lead-up to the assembly after it signalled that the governments of Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela have been unlikely to attend, citing their respective human rights data and different points.

That has thrown the attendance checklist into query.

Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has stated that he doesn’t wish to attend the summit until each nation within the area is invited, and it stays unclear if he’ll journey to Los Angeles.

“Is it going to be the Summit of the Americas or is it going to be the chums of America summit?” the Mexican chief stated on Friday.

Biden despatched his particular adviser for the assembly, former Senator Chris Dodd, to Brazil final week to persuade Bolsonaro to go to the gathering, which the US is internet hosting for the primary time since its inaugural session in 1994.

The provide of a bilateral assembly with Biden helped sway Bolsonaro, the Reuters information company reported, citing folks aware of the matter.

Biden tells ‘friend’ Kishida US is committed to Japan’s defence | International Trade News

US president’s two-day go to will culminate within the formal launch of an financial plan for deeper engagement in Asia.

President Joe Biden assured his “good pal” Prime Minister Fumio Kishida of Japan on Monday that the US is totally dedicated to Japan’s defence, amid simmering stress with China and the ramifications of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

The cornerstone of Biden’s two-day go to, which incorporates conferences with the leaders of Japan, India and Australia, within the “Quad” group, would be the launch of an Indo-Pacific Financial Framework, a broad plan offering an financial pillar for US engagement with Asia.

“The US-Japan alliance has lengthy been the cornerstone of peace and prosperity within the Indo-Pacific, and the US stays totally dedicated to Japan’s defence,” Biden mentioned firstly of talks with Kishida on the Akasaka Palace in central Tokyo.

Biden was greeted with a navy honour guard that performed the anthems of each international locations beneath a brilliant blue sky.

Earlier, he met Emperor Naruhito, speaking briefly on the palace entrance earlier than being ushered inside. The White Home mentioned Biden provided greetings on behalf of the American individuals, highlighting the energy of the US-Japan relationship anchored by deep people-to-people ties.

The 2 nations are anticipated to debate Japan’s plans to increase its navy capabilities and attain in response to China’s rising would possibly.

The allies are additionally anticipated to reconfirm their shut ties within the face of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, agreeing that unilateral adjustments to the established order by pressure are unacceptable.

Worries are rising in Asia about an more and more assertive China, notably in gentle of its shut ties to Russia, and stress particularly has been rising over self-ruled Taiwan, which China considers a renegade province.

North Korea and regional points may also be on the agenda, with Biden afterward Monday scheduled to fulfill households of Japanese who had been kidnapped years in the past to coach spies in North Korea.

However the centrepiece of the day might be Biden’s launch of the Indo-Pacific Financial Framework for Prosperity (IPEF), a programme to bind international locations extra carefully by frequent requirements in areas together with supply-chain resilience, clear power, infrastructure and digital commerce.

America has lacked an financial pillar to its Indo-Pacific engagement since former President Donald Trump withdrew from a multinational Trans-Pacific commerce settlement, leaving the sector open to China to increase its affect.

However the IPEF is unlikely to incorporate binding commitments, and Asian international locations and commerce consultants have given a decidedly lukewarm response to a programme restricted by Biden’s reluctance to threat American jobs by providing the elevated market entry the area craves.

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi is due in Japan for the Quad talks, with Australia’s new prime minister, Anthony Albanese, additionally anticipated.

Biden arrived in Japan late on Sunday from South Korea and can depart on Tuesday for the US.

Biden names Karine Jean-Pierre as new White House press secretary | Politics News

Jean-Pierre will turn out to be first Black lady to carry key put up when Jen Psaki leaves White Home subsequent week.

Karine Jean-Pierre would be the subsequent White Home press secretary, the Biden administration has introduced, as Jen Psaki is stepping down from the put up subsequent week.

In a press release on Thursday, US President Joe Biden stated Jean-Pierre would step into the press secretary position when Psaki leaves the White Home on Could 13. She will even act as his assistant.

I’m proud to announce that Karine Jean-Pierre will function the following White Home Press Secretary,” Biden stated.

“Karine not solely brings the expertise, expertise and integrity wanted for this troublesome job, however she is going to proceed to prepared the ground in speaking in regards to the work of the Biden-Harris Administration on behalf of the American individuals.”

Jean-Pierre is at the moment the White Home’s deputy press secretary and deputy assistant to Biden.

She beforehand held senior communication and political roles in Biden’s presidential marketing campaign crew and when he served as vice-president in the course of the Obama administration, the White Home assertion stated.

Jean-Pierre additionally was the chief public affairs officer of the progressive group MoveOn.org and a former political analyst for NBC and MSNBC.

Psaki praised her successor, noting the importance of the history-making appointment.

“She would be the first Black lady and the primary brazenly LGBTQ+ particular person to function the White Home Press Secretary,” Psaki stated. “Illustration issues and she is going to give a voice to many, but additionally make many dream large about what is actually potential.”

U.S. White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki holds the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 7, 2022.
Psaki says Jean-Pierre ‘will give a voice to many’ [File: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters]

Jean-Pierre stated Thursday was a “very emotional day”, when requested about turning into the primary Black lady to function White Home press secretary. “It is a historic second, and it’s not misplaced on me,” she stated throughout a briefing.

“I perceive how necessary it’s for thus many individuals on the market, so many alternative communities, that I stand on their shoulders and I’ve been all through my profession. And so, it’s an honour and a privilege to be behind this podium in a few week or so when Jen is prepared.”

When she took the press secretary position, Psaki stated publicly that she aimed to stay within the job for a few yr.

In Thursday’s assertion, Biden thanked Psaki for her contribution to his administration, saying she “set the usual for returning decency, respect and decorum to the White Home Briefing Room”.

“I wish to say thanks to Jen for elevating the bar, speaking instantly and honestly to the American individuals, and maintaining her humorousness whereas doing so. I thank Jen her service to the nation, and need her the perfect as she strikes ahead.”

 

Biden restores stricter environmental review after Trump rollback | Climate News

White Home says new rule will restore neighborhood safeguards in opinions of pipelines and different main US initiatives.

US President Joe Biden’s administration is restoring federal laws that require rigorous environmental assessment of enormous infrastructure initiatives equivalent to highways, pipelines and oil wells — together with probably impacts on local weather change and close by communities.

The longstanding opinions have been scaled again by the Trump administration in a bid to fast-track initiatives and create jobs.

A US rule finalised on Tuesday will restore key provisions of the Nationwide Environmental Coverage Act, a bedrock environmental legislation designed to make sure neighborhood safeguards throughout opinions for a variety of federal proposals, together with roads, bridges and vitality initiatives authorised in the $1 trillion infrastructure law Biden signed in November, the White Home mentioned.

The White Home Council on Environmental High quality (CEQ) mentioned the brand new rule, which takes impact in late Might, ought to resolve challenges created by the Trump-era coverage and restore public confidence throughout environmental opinions.

“Restoring these fundamental neighborhood safeguards will present regulatory certainty, scale back battle and assist be sure that initiatives get constructed proper the primary time,” mentioned CEQ Chair Brenda Mallory. “Patching these holes within the environmental assessment course of will assist initiatives get constructed sooner, be extra resilient and supply larger advantages to individuals who stay close by.”

Brenda Mallory speaks at The Queen Theater in Wilmington, Delaware, US.
Brenda Mallory, chair of the White Home’s Council on Environmental High quality, says new guidelines will assist restore neighborhood safeguards [File: Carolyn Kaster/AP Photo]

Former President Donald Trump overhauled the environmental reviews in 2020 in a bid to speed up initiatives he mentioned would enhance the financial system and supply jobs.

The rule change imposed that 12 months restricted the timelines for environmental opinions and public remark and allowed federal officers to ignore a mission’s position in cumulative results, equivalent to local weather change.

Environmental teams and African American, Latino and Indigenous activists had protested the Trump-era rule change, saying it could worsen pollution in areas already reeling from oil refineries, chemical crops and different hazardous websites.

The Biden administration has made addressing such environmental justice points a key precedence.

The transfer comes because the Supreme Court docket reinstated a separate Trump-era rule that curtails the facility of states and Native American tribes to dam pipelines and different vitality initiatives that may pollute rivers, streams and different waterways.

In a call that cut up the courtroom 5-4 earlier this month, the justices agreed to halt a decrease courtroom decide’s order throwing out the Trump rule. The choice doesn’t intrude with the Biden administration’s plan to rewrite the Environmental Safety Company regulation.

Pipeline used to carry crude oil is shown at the Superior, Wisconsin terminal of Enbridge Energy.
The rule introduced on Tuesday restores very important provisions of the Nationwide Environmental Coverage Act [File: Jim Mone/AP Photo]

Opposite to frequent assertions by Trump and others in his administration, Mallory mentioned a extra rigorous environmental assessment will really pace up the completion of essential initiatives since they are going to be extra prone to face up to a authorized problem by environmental teams or states.

Many Trump-era environmental decisions have been reversed or delayed by courts after findings they didn’t bear adequate evaluation.

Environmental teams hailed the rule change, which they mentioned restores bedrock environmental protections beneath NEPA, a 1970 legislation that requires the federal government to just accept public feedback and take environmental, financial and well being impacts into consideration earlier than approving any main mission.

“NEPA performs a important position in preserving our communities and our surroundings wholesome and protected, and Donald Trump’s makes an attempt to weaken NEPA have been clearly nothing greater than a handout to company polluters,” mentioned Leslie Fields, the Sierra Membership’s nationwide director of coverage, advocacy and authorized affairs.

The White Home motion “reestablishes important NEPA safeguards and ensures they are going to proceed to guard individuals and communities immediately and in future generations”, she mentioned.

Enterprise teams and Republican legislators criticised the rule change, saying it could decelerate vital infrastructure developments.

“Vital initiatives that handle important points like bettering entry to public transit, including extra clear vitality to the grid and increasing broadband entry are languishing attributable to continued delays and that should change,” mentioned Chad Whiteman, vp for surroundings and regulatory affairs for the US Chamber of Commerce.