Can the Gulf secure energy supplies for Germany and Europe? | Energy

From: Inside Story

German chancellor excursions Gulf international locations searching for different suppliers.

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz is within the Gulf, hoping to safe new partnerships with oil and gas-rich nations.

He met leaders of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar hoping to agree on easy methods to meet nations’ vitality wants since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Because the struggle started in February, European Union international locations have needed to in the reduction of on vitality and search for provides exterior of Russia.

So how is fuel shaping the politics of the area because the struggle in Ukraine goes on?

Presenter: Hazem Sika

Visitors:

Ulrich Brueckner – Professor of political science at Stanford College in Berlin

Mahjoob Zweiri – Director of Gulf Research Middle at Qatar College

Andreas Goldthau – Professor on the Willy Brandt Faculty of Public Coverage on the College of Erfurt

‘Terrifying’: Days of terror under Colombia’s Gulf Clan cartel | Drugs News

Bogota, Colombia – “It was terrifying.”

That’s how a resident of Tierralta, in Colombia’s northern division of Cordoba, described a days-long siege imposed earlier this month by one of many nation’s largest paramilitary teams, the Autodefensas Gaitanistas de Colombia (AGC), also referred to as the Gulf Clan.

From the morning of Could 5 till midnight on Could 9, the armed group enforced a self-declared “armed strike” throughout the nation’s northwest in response to the extradition to the United States of its detained former chief Dairo Antonio Usuga, also referred to as Otoniel.

The Gulf Clan took management of 11 of Colombia’s 32 departments over the four-day span. It imposed strict lockdowns, shuttered native companies, closed off roads, disrupted transportation hyperlinks, and warned residents to remain inside or threat being shot or having their vehicles burned.

A number of cities ran out of fundamental provides similar to meals and fuel, whereas native hospitals confronted workers shortages. Elsewhere, households have been stranded at transport terminals, unable to get residence attributable to blocked roads, local media reported.

“You reside with the priority that it may occur once more tomorrow,” stated one other resident of Tierralta, Raul, who additionally requested to make use of a pseudonym due to safety issues. “As a result of the Gulf Clan are exhibiting that they’ve the ability to create worry,” he advised Al Jazeera.

Otoniel capture in Colombia
Accused drug trafficker and Gulf Clan chief ‘Otoniel’ was captured in October of final 12 months [File: Colombian President’s Office via AP Photo]

Lots of of rights violations

The Gulf Clan’s armed strike passed off three weeks earlier than Colombians will vote for their next president, elevating issues about the opportunity of repeated violence because the inhabitants heads to the polls on Could 29.

“The federal government response to this occasion leaves folks extra dissatisfied with their skill to precise their political concepts or to take part in democracy. This occasion could be very, very detrimental to the standard of democracy in Colombia and to the native perceptions of safety,” stated Sergio Guzman, director of the Colombia Threat Evaluation consultancy group.

Throughout the course of the “strike”, the Gulf Clan dedicated no less than 309 acts of violence, in response to the Special Jurisdiction of Peace (JEP) tribunal, which additionally registered the pressured closure of 26 roads, the destruction of no less than 118 automobiles and the disruption of 54 transport terminals.

A complete of 178 totally different municipalities within the nation have been below Gulf Clan management, with 138 of them below strict lockdown guidelines.

“They needed to reveal their army power to point out that in lots of areas of the nation they’re the de facto authority and never the state,” stated a JEP consultant, who spoke to Al Jazeera on situation of anonymity with a view to communicate freely.

The JEP was fashioned within the wake of a 2016 peace deal between the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) group and the federal government, with a mandate to research, prosecute and punish these accountable for essentially the most critical human rights violations.

Twenty-four civilians have been killed in the course of the “strike”, the JEP additionally stated, and an extra 15 tried murders have been recorded. The Ministry of Defence reported six deaths, whereas NGO Indepaz recorded 18 over the course of the strike.

The JEP official advised Al Jazeera that three social leaders – a time period utilized in Colombia to explain activists, group representatives and rights defenders – have been amongst these killed.

‘Sturdy failure’

The Colombian authorities hailed Otoniel’s seize in October of final 12 months and subsequent extradition to the US this month as successful – and a definitive blow to the Gulf Glan’s operations.

Nonetheless, final week’s armed strike proved the group, which native NGO Pares has stated counts as many as 3,260 members, is under no circumstances on shaky floor, analysts stated.

For the reason that 2016 peace settlement below which the FARC demobilised, armed teams such because the Gulf Clan have taken benefit of the ability vacuum in a lot of Colombia’s rural areas. The Gulf Clan operates clandestinely in roughly 109 municipalities throughout the nation, in response to rights group Indepaz, however most predominantly within the north. It controls quite a few drug trafficking routes and cocaine processing labs, and makes use of violence to extort and intimidate populations.

“This occasion underscores how a lot the federal government underestimated the character of the [Gulf Clan’s] risk. That is very sophisticated for the federal government to by some means spin this in the direction of something however a strong failure of their safety technique,” Guzman advised Al Jazeera.

Regardless of the strike being introduced early on Could 4, no army response from the federal government was seen till Could 7, when troops have been deployed to the affected Bolivar, Sucre, Cordoba and Antioquia areas to accompany automobiles and safe the roads. In response to Ministry of Defence figures, greater than 19,000 troops have been deployed throughout the realm.

Colombian President Ivan Duque
Colombia’s President Ivan Duque stated the Gulf Clan carried out ‘cowardly assaults’ [File: Nathalia Angarita/Reuters]

“They search to generate intimidation by way of remoted occasions and cowardly assaults, which they search to maximise on-line and within the media,” President Ivan Duque advised reporters final Saturday. “They’re desperately making an attempt to point out a power that they don’t have.”

However Guzman stated the Gulf Clan will “probably be emboldened by the dearth of confrontation with the army”.

“The federal government doesn’t need to contribute to the ‘we’re again to struggle’ narrative, so escalating the scenario couldn’t simply have very vital collateral injury issues, however may additionally subtract considerably from the federal government’s narrative that they’re preserving order within the nation,” he stated.

“The Gulf Clan simply ripped a gap by way of the narrative by making it tough for the federal government to claim its authority over one-third of its territory.”

Colombia’s Defence Ministry didn’t instantly reply to Al Jazeera’s request for remark.

In the meantime, the JEP consultant described the federal government’s response as “not very environment friendly” whereas residents subjected to the 4 days below Gulf Clan management have been equally crucial, saying they felt deserted.

“The state demonstrated that it’s a weak establishment that doesn’t have the capability to confront an armed group that has confirmed to have management of nationwide territory and a terrific power on the nationwide stage,” stated Jose David Ortega, a resident and human rights defender within the metropolis of Monteria, which was besieged by the group.

Raul, the Tierralta resident, added, “What hurts essentially the most is that the state by no means got here out to defend the rights of its residents.”

Songs of the Gulf | History

From: Al Jazeera World

4 songs from Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and Iraq reveal a wealthy supply of tales from the Arabian Gulf.

Racist slurs, satire, an historical Islamic “advert” and World Cup soccer pleasure are the inspirations for these 4 music tales from the Arabian Gulf.

In Kuwait, the Haydoo music was born as an expression of pleasure within the face of disagreeable slurs within the 1981 World Cup; in Oman, a satirical music a couple of cat and mouse is de facto in regards to the political scenario within the Seventies; an outdated Qatari phrase, “shoomelah”, that means “rise to him”, turned the lyrics of the nation’s important soccer anthem; and in Iraq, an historical poem in regards to the virtues of black veils turned what is taken into account the oldest “commercial” in Islamic historical past.

Away from politics and struggle, this musical mini-tour sheds gentle and provides insights right into a area typically poorly represented within the media.

Photos: Nepal workers look to Gulf to escape forced-labour system | Gallery News

After working for 2 years in Saudi Arabia, Raj Kumar Mahato returned to his dwelling in Nepal’s Siraha district to grow to be an activist in opposition to a compelled labour system, domestically referred to as haruwa-charuwa.

Haruwa is a neighborhood time period to explain an individual who ploughs land for others, whereas charuwa are the employees who herd cattle.

Below the system prevalent in Nepal’s central and jap Terai area, a belt of flat land stretching alongside the Nepal-India border, landowners belonging to privileged castes entrap poor villagers in a debt-bondage by offering them loans at excessive rates of interest. Then they compel them to work for them for years, generally even generations, because the poor debtors make useless makes an attempt to repay their loans.

The type of work constitutes compelled labour, in keeping with worldwide conventions.

“We’re just like the medieval serfs serving a king. Our position in life is known to be servants of wealthy males who personal huge lands however can’t domesticate it themselves,” Mahato, 37, informed Al Jazeera.

Based on a 2013 report (PDF) on compelled labour in Nepal’s agriculture sector, printed by the Worldwide Labour Organisation (ILO), an amazing 95 p.c of households employed within the haruwa-charuwa system are victims of compelled labour.

Nepal’s Dalit community, the bottom group within the advanced Hindu caste system, is essentially the most exploited within the haruwa-charuwa system. Discriminated in each sphere of their lives, poor Dalits fall prey to debt traps laid by landlords belonging to the privileged castes.

The haruwa-charuwa labourers usually toil from morning to nightfall in the course of the peak agricultural season, however obtain minimal compensation for his or her work.

“We offer farmers small day by day wages and loans at a 3 p.c month-to-month rate of interest to purchase seeds and farm instruments they should domesticate the land. After the harvest, we take 50 p.c of the manufacturing they usually preserve the remainder,” Amjad Ansari Arnama, a 35-year-old haruwa–charuwa profiteer, informed Al Jazeera.

“My household is the village’s largest landowner, so we invite villagers to work in our agricultural fields. Out of 30 households within the village, about half of them work for us,” stated Arnama, who lives in Mahanaur, a village near the Nepal-India border.

The system makes Mahato livid. “None of that is authorized, it’s an off-the-cuff system. All of us aspire to be free as a result of actually, who needs to be wealthy males’s slave?” he asks.

Nepal’s Bonded Labour (Prohibition) Act, 2002 says “nobody shall preserve or make use of anybody as a bonded labourer”. However the regulation couldn’t cease debt bondage and compelled labour practices within the Himalayan nation.

Many victims noticed the affluent Gulf area as the sunshine on the finish of the tunnel. The ILO report says the “opening up of international employment alternatives” can result in the erosion of the haruwa-charuwa system, nevertheless modest.

In 2020, Nepal earned $8.1bn from remittances – a few quarter of its gross home product (GDP).

Employed by a meat packaging firm in Saudi Arabia till 2015, Mahato stated Gulf jobs are “higher” than the haruwa-charuwa system, however the employee-employer relations are “hardly totally different”.

“The pay was higher, lodging and meals have been offered, however I nonetheless labored for a wealthy particular person on the finish of the day. There isn’t a one to hearken to us and our issues, to be compassionate. Being a poor man will all the time be exhausting, be it in Nepal or Saudi Arabia,” he says.

Additionally, migrating to Gulf states shouldn’t be the silver bullet to flee exploitation. Nepali landowners preserve a grip on these fleeing the haruwa-charuwa system, with recruitment businesses charging Gulf-bound employees giant sums of cash to get them a job, violating Nepal’s regulation that caps recruitment charges charged on employees to 10,000 rupees ($82).

With no liquid belongings in hand to pay the unlawful recruitment charges, aspiring employees flip to the identical landowners who exploit them to fund their migration at an exorbitant charge of curiosity. At occasions, the employees even pledge one of many grownup members of their household as collateral.

All of the households interviewed by Al Jazeera within the jap terai area took loans emigrate.

Compelled to wire a reimbursement dwelling each month to pay mortgage instalments, expat employees grow to be victims of abusive working circumstances till their mortgage is repaid.

*Title modified to guard the identification of the interviewee. Ramu Sapkota contributed to this report.