Blinken discusses trade, migration with Mexican counterpart | Politics News

High US diplomat Antony Blinken travels to Mexico Metropolis for high-level financial talks with Mexican authorities officers.

United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken has mentioned “problems with mutual curiosity” along with his Mexican counterpart, together with drug trafficking, migration and commerce, as prime officers from the 2 nations met for high-level financial talks in Mexico Metropolis.

The US State Division mentioned in an announcement on Monday that Blinken famous “his continued appreciation for collaboration with Mexico” in his discussions with Mexico’s International Minister Marcelo Ebrard.

“Additionally they mentioned regional efforts to help the folks of Haiti as nicely Mexico and america’s continued cooperation to create a simpler United Nations,” US State Division Spokesperson Ned Value mentioned within the assertion.

Blinken was joined by US Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo and different Biden administration officers on the journey to the Mexican capital for this 12 months’s US-Mexico Excessive-Stage Financial Dialogue.

“Final 12 months, our two presidents agreed to relaunch the high-level financial dialogue. They recognised collectively {that a} robust US-Mexico relationship was very important,” Blinken mentioned throughout the talks.

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador struck a conciliatory notice earlier within the day on a significant dispute with the US over Mexican vitality coverage, saying Washington had adopted a extra respectful perspective in the direction of his place.

In July, the US commerce consultant demanded dispute settlement talks with Mexico, arguing Lopez Obrador’s drive to tighten state management of the vitality market was unfair to US corporations and certain in breach of a regional commerce deal.

Lopez Obrador, who has solid his vitality coverage as a matter of nationwide sovereignty, on the time responded defiantly, saying he would defend Mexico’s place at an independence day army parade going down this coming Friday.

Nonetheless, on Monday he mentioned he would not check with the vitality dispute throughout his Friday speech as a result of US President Joe Biden had responded to his considerations positively.

“There’s a unique tone. There’s a respectful perspective. Relatively, it’s a reaffirmation of respect for our nationwide sovereignty,” Lopez Obrador informed an everyday information convention, referring to a letter he mentioned he acquired from Biden.

Translation: I had the pleasure of welcoming Antony Blinken, US Secretary of State, and Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo. Welcome!

The US vitality criticism, which Canada instantly joined, is arguably essentially the most important dispute to floor below the United States-Mexico-Canada Settlement (USMCA) for the reason that North American commerce deal got here into impact in 2020.

If unresolved, it may result in the imposition of hefty commerce tariffs towards Mexico, analysts say.

Ebrard, the Mexican international minister, mentioned Monday’s talks had been very productive and that Mexico had been invited to take part in a US push to strengthen semiconductor output and electromobility in North America.

Ebrard added that the vitality dispute was not the focus of Monday’s agenda and that it had taken up “not more than 5 p.c” of the dialog within the presidential palace.

Washington is more and more seeking to the Mexican authorities to assist tackle the rising variety of refugees and migrants arriving on the US-Mexico border.

However ties between the 2 nations have been examined in latest months after Lopez Obrador snubbed Biden by refusing to take part within the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles on the grounds that Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua had not been invited.

That prompted the US president to ask his Mexican counterpart to go to the White Home in July to restore relations.

‘Human crisis’: Chicago seeks help as Texas buses over migrants | Migration News

Chicago says about 125 asylum seekers, lots of them households with young children, arrived on board buses from Texas to this point.

A political battle over the immigration insurance policies of US President Joe Biden’s administration has expanded in current days, with officers in Chicago asking for volunteers and donations to help with asylum seekers being bused into the town from Texas.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot lately advised reporters that about 125 migrants have arrived within the metropolis on board buses from Texas, together with 50 individuals who arrived on Sunday alone, most of them households.

“We’re a welcoming metropolis, so we’re at all times gonna step up and do the fitting factor to be sure that migrants who’re coming right here to our metropolis are effectively acquired,” Lightfoot mentioned throughout a information convention on Sunday night.

The mayor mentioned Chicago had not but heard from any Texas officers and urged the state’s Republican governor, Greg Abbott, to collaborate on a extra humane therapy of the asylum seekers and migrants.

“My frustration comes from the actions of the governor of Texas,” Lightfoot mentioned. “There could possibly be a degree of coordination and cooperation however he chooses to do none of this stuff.”

Political tensions have elevated over the rising variety of asylum seekers arriving on the United States-Mexico border. Abbott, who’s looking for a 3rd time period in workplace within the November midterm elections, has seized on the problem of record-high arrivals on the border to spice up his marketing campaign.

Since April, Texas has bused greater than 7,000 asylum seekers and migrants to Washington, DC, and New York Metropolis, and final week, Abbott started sending buses to Chicago.

He says extra cities could possibly be added to the checklist and that the buses are wanted as a result of the Biden administration has did not successfully safe the border.

The Democratic mayors of Washington, DC, and New York Metropolis have denounced the transfer and known as on the federal authorities to assist.

Lightfoot on Sunday mentioned a number of support organisations in Chicago have stepped in and began offering help. “He [Abbott] tries to ship human beings — not cargo, not freight, however human beings — throughout the nation to an unsure vacation spot,” Lightfoot mentioned. “He’s manufacturing a human disaster and it is mindless to me.”

On Sunday, Chicago launched a brand new web site urging residents to donate objects to assist the brand new arrivals, together with toothpaste, toothbrushes and different toiletries; diapers; blankets; child components, and Spanish-language books for kids, amongst different issues.

Refugees and migrants waiting
Lots of the refugees and migrants being bused from Texas are from Venezuela, Haiti, Cuba and Nicaragua, amongst different nations [File: Paul Ratje/Reuters]

“We anticipate that the state of Texas will proceed to bus migrants to Chicago and we stay dedicated to offering help and sources to our newly arrived neighbors throughout this transition interval,” the web site reads.

Chicago is a so-called “sanctuary metropolis”, which implies that metropolis officers is not going to ask residents about their immigration standing or deny them companies on the premise of that standing, nor will they share such data with federal immigration authorities (PDF).

The US has used a pandemic restriction often known as “Title 42” to expel most asylum seekers who arrive on the nation’s southern border again to Mexico or to their nation of origin.

Roughly 2 million Title 42 expulsions had been carried out between October 1, 2021, and the tip of July this yr, in keeping with statistics from US Customs and Border Safety. The numbers embrace repeat crossers.

Abbott is busing refugees and migrants out of Texas as a part of a technique to share the burden with liberal cities. In response to the Texas Tribute, Texas has to this point spent practically $13m on the hassle.

The Republican governor of Arizona, Doug Ducey, has additionally been sending buses to Washington, DC, and New York Metropolis.

Lots of the asylum seekers and migrants being bused come from Venezuela, Haiti, Cuba and Nicaragua, in addition to different nations. Many are travelling with young children and have struggled to safe everlasting housing, entry training and obtain medical care, volunteers have mentioned.

UK to ‘fast track’ deportations of Albanian asylum seekers | Migration News

UK’s house secretary unveils new measures aiming to discourage Albanians from crossing the English Channel in small boats.

The UK has introduced plans to “fast-track” the deportation of Albanian asylum seekers as authorities try and sort out a surge in individuals crossing the English Channel in small boats.

British immigration officers will instantly course of asylum claims made by Albanians getting into the UK on small boats, and people with no proper to stay within the nation might be eliminated “as quickly as attainable”, based on the Dwelling Workplace, which oversees border enforcement.

The company desires to dissuade Albanians from making the dangerous crossing in inflatable boats by demonstrating that they won’t be allowed to reside and work within the UK. That message can also be being delivered by a sequence of Albanian-language commercials on social media websites.

“Giant numbers of Albanians are being bought lies by ruthless people-smugglers and harsh organised crime gangs, main them to take treacherous journeys in flimsy boats to the UK,” Dwelling Secretary Priti Patel mentioned in an announcement on Thursday. “This abuse of our immigration system and other people risking their lives can not go on.”

The variety of Albanians crossing the Channel on small boats has soared in current months, despite the fact that the UK considers Albania a “secure and affluent nation”, based on Dwelling Workplace statistics launched on Thursday.

About 2,165 Albanians arrived within the UK through this route within the first six months of 2022, in contrast with simply 23 in the identical interval final 12 months.

General, 12,747 individuals entered the UK on small boats in the course of the first half of the 12 months, greater than double the earlier 12 months’s determine.

Albanians are actually tied with Afghans as the largest nationalities arriving on small boats, with every accounting for 18 p.c of the entire.

Attainable deportation to Rwanda

The Dwelling Workplace publicity marketing campaign will search to reverse this pattern by warning migrants that they face attainable deportation to Rwanda and elevated jail sentences for immigration offences.

The commercials additionally present info on secure immigration routes and recommendation to use for asylum within the first secure nation a migrant reaches.

The measures had been introduced after conferences between Patel and her Albanian counterpart, Minister for Inside Affairs Bledi Cuci.

He mentioned the 2 ministers additionally mentioned methods to offer extra alternatives for Albanian labourers and expert professionals to work legally within the UK.

“We discourage these unlawful and harmful practices,” Cuci mentioned of the small boat crossings.

At least five migrants dead, 66 rescued in waters off Puerto Rico | Migration News

The US Coast Guard says the migrants drowned after being pressured out of their boat by folks smugglers.

Not less than 5 migrants drowned and one other 66 have been rescued in an incident involving a suspected human smuggling boat close to an uninhabited island west of Puerto Rico, officers in america have mentioned.

The our bodies have been discovered on Thursday by Puerto Rico Division of Pure and Environmental Assets Park Rangers on Mona Island, the Coast Guard mentioned in a press release, including that 66 survivors together with two minors have been safely ashore.

“The smugglers principally pressured the migrants to disembark, it seems that 5 of the migrants drowned within the course of,” Jeffrey Quinones, public affairs officer for US Customs and Border Safety (CBP), informed the Reuters information company in a phone interview.

US Coast Guard spokesman Ricardo Castrodad informed The Related Press that the boat fled the scene, and it was unclear how many individuals have been on board at the moment.

A CBP official informed the Miami Herald newspaper that most people are believed to be Haitians.

The incident is the newest in a string of lethal voyages throughout the northern Caribbean carrying principally Haitians fleeing their nation amid a spike in gang-related killings and kidnappings. Lots of the Haitians have been heading to the US.

Most attempt to enter the US by land, via the southern border with Mexico. However beginning in March 2020, the US has been imposing Title 42, a pandemic-era rule that has prevented nearly all of folks from claiming asylum on the border. Beneath the measure, many Haitians have been expelled to their crisis-stricken island on board deportation flights.

The incident got here simply days after authorities within the Bahamas recovered the our bodies of 17 migrants and rescued 25 others after their boat capsized. A prison investigation is constant.

Helicopter
The Miami Herald newspaper reported that helicopters and rescue boats have been dispatched to the scene of the incident [File: United States Coast Guard/Handout via Reuters]

On Could, 11 Haitian girls drowned and 38 others have been saved after their boat sank close to Puerto Rico. In the meantime in March, a picket boat carrying 300 Haitians capsized in shallow waters close to the coast of Florida, and lots of required medical consideration.

A least two Coast Guard helicopters and two patrol boats have been dispatched to the scene of the incident on Thursday, based on the Miami Herald.

Mona Island, a nature reserve, is situated between the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico and has over time been utilized by smugglers carrying folks between the 2. These on that route are usually Dominican or Haitian.

“Plenty of occasions [smugglers] depart folks on Mona Island, main them to imagine that they’re in Puerto Rico,” Joel Seijo, a spokesman for Puerto Rico’s Division of Pure and Environmental Assets informed Reuters.

Despairing teen refugee found hanged in Libya detention centre | Migration News

WARNING: The next story incorporates pictures which may be disturbing to some readers.

The image of a 19-year-old’s physique hanging lifeless from the ceiling in one of many halls-cum-dorms of the Ain Zara detention centre, south of Libya’s capital, Tripoli, is the most recent proof of the human price of the nation’s detention centres.

Mohamed Mahmoud Abdel Aziz, a refugee from Sudan’s war-torn area of Darfur, is believed to have killed himself on June 5 after being launched and apprehended once more within the span of two weeks.

Hundreds of refugees and asylum seekers in Libya are languishing within the centres, trapped in infinite cycles of detention and abuse with dire repercussions for his or her psychological well being and security.

Asylum seekers who spoke to Al Jazeera from inside Ain Zara stated Abdel Aziz’s physique was left hanging for hours within the room the place he lived with a whole lot of others.

Mustafa, one other Sudanese asylum seeker who requested that his title be modified to guard his id, advised Al Jazeera the picture of Abdel Aziz’s physique was taken covertly by detainees on the centre. Libyan authorities later confiscated telephones to forestall the picture from spreading, and dozens weren’t returned.

Mohamed Mahmoud Abdel Aziz, 19, hanged himself in Ain Zara detention centre.
Mohamed Mahmoud Abdel Aziz, 19, is believed to have hanged himself in Ain Zara detention centre, close to the Libyan capital Tripoli. [Al Jazeera via sources]

Mustafa stated individuals trapped within the detention centre are rising more and more determined as they see little or no hope for the longer term.

“We now have been right here for 5 months,” he stated. “Mohamed acquired uninterested in this till he reached this stage and he [killed himself].”

Let out, then detained once more

Abdel Aziz and Mustafa had been arrested in an in a single day raid whereas peacefully demonstrating for relocation, safety, and evacuation from Libya outdoors the United Nations’ refugee company (UNHCR) on January 10.

Greater than 600 individuals had been violently arrested and detained that day. The protests adopted a serious crackdown within the western city of Gargaresh, a hub for asylum seekers from African nations, that displaced 1000’s of individuals and resulted within the detention of a minimum of 5,000.

Abdel Aziz was let out on Could 23 as a part of a gaggle of 99 asylum seekers, together with 46 kids, evacuated from Ain Zara with the assist of UNHCR.

He possible spent days on the streets earlier than being apprehended once more by Libyan authorities and brought again to the centre, the place he’s believed to have taken his personal life shortly after.

Mohamed Mahmoud Abdel Aziz.
Mohamed Mahmoud Abdel Aziz [Al Jazeera via sources]

“He was given 500 dinar ($104) but it surely was not sufficient to hire any room to remain in,” Mustafa stated. “The UNHCR makes you signal a paper saying they can not assist with lodging.”

The UNHCR advised Al Jazeera in a written assertion that it was “saddened by the tragic dying of the younger asylum seeker”. It didn’t affirm the sum of help allotted however stated {the teenager} had “acquired money help in several instalments by means of our city programmes”.

The company offered a replica of the consent kind for switch, which states: “UNHCR is NOT offering lodging NOR can it organize for lodging.”

As of Could 22, the UNHCR estimates that there are 2,772 individuals held in detention centres throughout Libya.

The company stated it doesn’t maintain observe of how many individuals are re-apprehended after being launched with its assist.

The Libyan authorities didn’t reply to requests for remark.

Little oversight

Hussein Baumi, Libya and Egypt campaigner at Amnesty Worldwide, advised Al Jazeera detention centres in Libya function with more and more scarce oversight on the a part of worldwide organisations, together with the UNHCR and the Worldwide Organisation for Migration (IOM).

Libyan authorities have closed centres run by the Directorate for Combatting Unlawful Migration (DCIM) that had been rife with abuse, however comparable patterns of violations have been reproduced in newly opened or re-opened centres which can be run by militias away from scrutiny.

Amnesty has documented torture, merciless and inhuman detention circumstances, extortion and compelled labour, in addition to invasive, humiliating and violent strip searches inside detention services.

Even when somebody is launched, freedom will not be assured for lengthy.

“Lots of people who’re launched are captured once more, generally by the identical militias,” Baumi stated, including that detention is commonly profitable for armed teams who ask for ransom. “It’s not a secure house for migrants and asylum seekers.”

For individuals who had been hoping to cross by means of Libya on their solution to Europe, that’s usually not an choice.

The European Union has spent greater than 57.2 million euros ($64.8m) in Libya, with the declared goal of “sav[ing] the lives of these making harmful journeys by sea or land”, in response to a reality sheet printed by the European Fee in June 2021.

It has educated and geared up the Libyan coastguard to intercept boats of refugees and migrants hoping to make it to Europe and return them to Libyan shores. Human rights watchdogs have lengthy decried the alleged conduct of the coastguard, together with using firearms and the deliberate damaging of boats. 

To date in 2022, a minimum of 8,860 asylum seekers, refugees and migrants have been reported as intercepted by the Libyan coastguard and different naval authorities.

“Folks take boats understanding that they could die,” Baumi stated.

“That is the one approach for them to flee mistreatment in Libya.”

When you or somebody you realize is susceptible to suicide, these organisations might be able to assist.

US rolls out migration plan on final day of Americas summit | Migration News

Specialists query whether or not Summit of the Americas declaration will do sufficient to handle urgent wants within the area.

America has unveiled a plan that it says will assist nations throughout the Americas area deal with migration, as President Joe Biden’s administration seeks better cooperation to discourage rising numbers of asylum seekers from searching for to achieve the US.

The White Home on Friday launched a factsheet describing the “Los Angeles Declaration on Migration and Safety on the Summit of the Americas”, which seeks to “mobilize the complete area round daring actions that can remodel our strategy to managing migration”.

The Biden administration pledged a whole lot of tens of millions in support to Venezuelan migrants throughout the Western Hemisphere, in addition to programmes to help short-term family-based visas for Cubans and Haitians and ease the hiring of Central American staff, amongst different measures.

Biden and different regional leaders attending the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, California are anticipated to problem a joint declaration in a while Friday, the final day of talks which were marked by controversies.

Particularly, the US’s choice to exclude the leaders of Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua over these nations’ rights information has drawn appreciable criticism – and led Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador to skip the summit altogether.

Some leaders this week slammed Washington for not extending invites to all of the heads of state, with analysts additionally declaring that the choice might hamper US efforts to handle urgent points going through the Americas.

On the summit’s opening session on Thursday, leaders from Argentina and tiny Belize took to the rostrum to rebuke Biden face-to-face over the visitor listing.

“It’s incorrect that Cuba and Venezuela [and] Nicaragua are usually not right here,” Barbados Prime Minister Mia Mottley advised the convention on Friday afternoon, stressing that “we have to communicate to these with whom we disagree”.

“These nations should equally recognise that you simply can not need to totally take part if you happen to’re not ready equally to have interaction and to see progress, and the straightforward precedence should be folks – not ideology,” Mottley stated.

“I hope that we go away right here right now aware that we must not ever once more come to a summit to speak at one another, however merely to speak with one another, in partnership and for the aim of the prosperity of our folks.”

‘Merely not sufficient’

Friday’s declaration aimed to create incentives for nations taking in giant numbers and unfold duty throughout the area, in addition to cement agreements and commitments already in place.

However some analysts have been sceptical that there can be many significant commitments.

Al Jazeera’s Latin America editor Lucia Newman stated whereas the declaration has been touted “as being imaginative, virtually revolutionary … while you have a look at the small print, it’s merely not sufficient to cope with this extraordinary migration disaster that the area is experiencing proper now.”

Newman, reporting from Chile’s capital Santiago, additionally burdened that migration flows within the Americas are usually not solely going within the path of the US and Canada. “But in addition from nations like Cuba and Venezuela in the direction of South America,” she stated.

In the meantime, the absence from the summit of the leaders of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador – the so-called “Northern Triangle” nations from which many migrants come – additionally has raised doubts about how successfully the proposed pledges will develop into actuality.

The Biden administration has sought to dissuade folks from searching for asylum on the US’s southern border amid a surge in arrivals, focusing a lot of its insurance policies on addressing the “root causes” of migration.

However that has not stopped many individuals from attempting to achieve the US, as dire socioeconomic circumstances, gang violence, unemployment and different points are pushing many to flee their residence nations.

This week, a migrant caravan made up largely of Venezuelans departed from southern Mexico certain for the US. However a pandemic-era restriction often known as Title 42 has remained in place on the border, permitting American authorities to instantly expel most asylum seekers with out providing them an opportunity to use for cover.

A migrant waits of the Mexican side of the border
The US has sought to dissuade asylum seekers from attempting to achieve its southern border amid a rise in arrivals [Marco Ugarte/AP Photo]

Ukrainians fleeing war try different ways to enter the US | Migration News

Round 14,500 Ukrainians have filed for purposes as of final week to come back to america below a humanitarian parole programme that enables Ukrainians to stick with American sponsors.

The administration of US President Joe Biden expects most Ukrainians whose lives have been upended by Russia’s invasion of their nation to remain in Europe. However in March, his administration introduced that it could anticipate up to 100,000 to remain and work within the US for as much as two years.

The “Uniting for Ukraine” programme was unrolled on April 25 and potential sponsors should add particulars about their employment and property. Candidates should move id and safety checks earlier than they’ll journey to the US and be thought of for enrollment.

The programme to help Ukrainians fleeing struggle comes amid continued strain on the Biden administration to allocate extra navy support to Ukraine, and concern extra sanctions towards Russia. In accordance with the United Nations, more than 5.8 million Ukrainians have fled their nation for the reason that February 24 invasion.

On March 3, the US Division of Homeland Safety (DHS) introduced that it could be extending temporary protected status to Ukrainians already within the nation for 18 months.

The Uniting for Ukraine programme has given Iryna Bashynskyy of Portland, Oregon, hope. Since February, Bashynskyy has been in search of methods to get her niece, Yana, out of Ukraine. Now, Bashynskyy is gathering paperwork, together with her tax returns and financial institution statements.

“It’s a hustle,” Bashynskyy advised Reuters. “However I’ll attempt to accomplish it.”

Yana requested to solely be recognized by her first identify as a consequence of security considerations.

“It’s essential to in some way escape from right here,” Yana, 23, stated via a translator from her residence in Kyiv. “I’m scared about my life, about my future. Since you don’t know the place a bomb will drop, at what time, and what’s going to occur.”

New York-based lawyer Marina Shepelsky has been receiving lots of of calls from folks with family in Ukraine. For the primary month and a half of the Russian invasion, Shepelsky – a Ukrainian refugee herself whose household fled the Soviet Union in 1989 – was advising them to use for vacationer visas.

“Now I’m type of discouraging it,” Shepelsky stated, saying Uniting for Ukraine affords “a greater standing”.

Almost 3,500 Ukrainians have been issued momentary US visas for tourism or enterprise in March, up sharply from about 900 in February, in line with US Division of State statistics.

Many Ukrainians had additionally been flying to Mexico and claiming asylum on the US-Mexico border by land.

Regardless of a coronavirus pandemic-era restriction in place, the US allowed hundreds of Ukrainians to use for asylum on the border, drawing rebuke from rights teams who denounced the truth that asylum seekers from different nationalities have been being turned away, and shining a lightweight on what Ukrainians stated was an advanced authorized course of to carry folks into the US.

DHS stated that as of April 25, when Uniting for Ukraine went reside, Ukrainians on the southwest border who didn’t have legitimate visas or pre-authorisation to journey to the US via Uniting for Ukraine may very well be denied entry.

The Related Press reported final week that some refugees who arrived on the US border in Tijuana have been advised they might not be admitted.

Leonard Mogul is looking for a spousal immigration visa for the girl he married in a non-denominational, 30-minute Zoom wedding ceremony in early March. Her wedding ceremony band was a hoop he had purchased her throughout a New 12 months’s trip in Cancun. He had tried earlier for a vacationer visa, and was given a visa interview appointment in late September.

“I didn’t need her to be alone in Europe by herself for that lengthy,” stated Mogul, who’s pursuing the spousal visa and doesn’t plan to use for Uniting for Ukraine.

Artem Plakhotnyi, a Scottsdale, Arizona-based dance instructor, had been making an attempt for weeks to guide an emergency visa appointment for his sister-in-law and her four-year-old twins. 4 days after Russian troopers invaded Ukraine, his cousin and his cousin’s nine-year-old daughter died making an attempt to flee Kharkiv, he stated. After repeated makes an attempt, he boarded a flight to Warsaw after which flew along with his family to Tijuana, the place they requested and acquired humanitarian parole final month.

In the meantime, lots of of Ukrainian refugees are tenting out in Mexico Metropolis whereas they look ahead to the US authorities to permit them into the nation.

About 500 evacuees have been ready as of final week in massive tents below a searing solar on a dusty subject on the east facet of Mexico’s sprawling capital. The camp has been open solely per week and from 50 to 100 persons are arriving day by day.

Dozens of migrants drown off Western Sahara: Charity | Migration News

Twelve others survived when their boat sunk off the coast of Cape Boujdour, a migrant support company says.

No less than 44 migrants and refugees drowned when their boat capsized off the coast of Morocco’s disputed area of Western Sahara, migrant support company Caminando Fronteras has mentioned.

Twelve others survived the tragedy that occurred on Sunday when the boat sunk off the coast of Cape Boujdour, the company’s Helena Maleno tweeted. The survivors had been arrested, Maleno wrote.

The our bodies of seven victims had been introduced again to shore however the others couldn’t be retrieved, she mentioned.

There was no quick affirmation from authorities in Morocco, which sees Western Sahara, a former Spanish colony, as an integral a part of the North African kingdom.

It was not clear the place the boat was heading, however normally, migrants leaving from that space attempt to attain Spain’s Canary Islands.

Morocco is a key transit point on routes taken by migrants and refugees hoping to succeed in Europe to hunt higher lives.

On Friday, Morocco and Spain mentioned in a joint assertion they had been dedicated to strengthening cooperation on irregular migration.

Greater than 14,700 tried irregular departures had been prevented and 52 human smuggling networks had been damaged up in Morocco throughout the first three months of this yr, in line with inside ministry figures.

Moroccan authorities stopped greater than 63,120 crossings final yr and shut down 256 smuggling networks.

In keeping with the Spanish inside ministry, greater than 40,000 migrants arrived within the nation by sea in 2021.

That very same yr, in line with Caminando Fronteras, 4,404 migrants died or went lacking as they tried to succeed in Spain.

Crisis-hit Sri Lanka to sell long-term ‘golden’ visas: Report | Migration News

Foreigners who deposit $100,000 domestically will likely be granted permission to stay and work in Sri Lanka for 10 years, says the report.

Money-strapped Sri Lanka has introduced it might promote long-term visas to draw desperately wanted international foreign money, says a report, because the island nation runs out of dollars to pay for meals and gas.

Foreigners who deposit a minimal of $100,000 domestically will likely be granted permission to stay and work in Sri Lanka for 10 years underneath the Golden Paradise Visa Programme, the federal government mentioned on Tuesday, based on the AFP information company.

The cash needs to be locked in a neighborhood checking account during the keep, the federal government mentioned in a press release.

“This scheme will assist Sri Lanka at a time when we face the worst monetary disaster since our independence,” media minister Nalaka Godahewa instructed reporters in Colombo.

The federal government additionally accepted the granting of five-year visas to any foreigner spending a minimal of $75,000 to purchase an house on the island.

Acute shortages of meals, gas and medicines have triggered widespread protests, with hundreds of individuals camped exterior President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s seafront workplace to demand his resignation.

Sri Lanka protests
Sri Lankan Muslims break their Ramadan quick whereas protesting close to the president’s workplace in Colombo [Ishara S Kodikara/AFP]

The federal government has signalled a willingness to contemplate constitutional reforms that would pare again the authority of the president, who gave himself sweeping powers to nominate and sack ministers, judges and public servants after his 2019 election.

His authorities additionally rolled again democratic reforms that gave statutory independence to the police, civil service, election fee and the judiciary.

Sri Lanka’s financial collapse started to be felt after the coronavirus pandemic torpedoed very important income from tourism and remittances.

Utilities unable to pay for gas imports have imposed prolonged day by day blackouts to ration energy, whereas lengthy traces snake round service stations as folks queue for petrol and kerosene.

Hospitals are wanting very important medicines, the federal government has appealed to residents overseas for donations and report inflation has added to on a regular basis hardships.

Sri Lankan officers arrived in america final week to barter a bailout with the Worldwide Financial Fund.

US-Cuba tensions persist after high-level migration talks | Migration News

Discussions on migration held in Washington this week amid growing numbers of Cubans making an attempt to enter the US.

Cuba’s overseas minister has referred to as on america to totally adjust to bilateral agreements between the 2 nations on migration and cease what he stated are insurance policies that stop Cubans from travelling to the US and overseas.

International Minister Bruno Rodriguez on Friday stated the US ought to cease “violating the rights of Cubans to journey” within the area.

“Cuba reiterates that the US ought to stop hindering and violating the rights of Cubans to journey to 3rd nations of the area and requires complete and non-selective compliance with the bilateral migration accords,” Rodriguez stated in a tweet.

His remarks got here a day after the US and Cuba held their highest-level diplomatic talks in 4 years, after a extreme disruption in ties through the administration of former President Donald Trump.

The discussions on Thursday in Washington between senior Division of State officers and Cuba’s deputy overseas minister centered on migration, with the US aspect desperate to rein in a rising variety of Cubans making an attempt to enter the US, typically with out documentation.

Cuba’s overseas ministry stated US policies and sanctions create “social and financial circumstances that incentivize emigration”.

The island’s authorities has additionally demanded the US issue more visas for Cubans wishing to journey to the US in step with prior agreements, and faulted the US for providing solely restricted consular providers in Havana, forcing Cubans to file for visas in Guyana as an alternative.

“These measures, together with these related to the acute tightening of the financial blockade, are resulting in the lack of human lives and … crimes comparable to illicit alien smuggling, migration fraud and people-trafficking, which have an effect on each nations and the area,” the overseas ministry stated in a statement.

In the meantime, the US Division of State stated the talks had coated areas of profitable cooperation but additionally recognized obstacles to making sure protected, orderly and authorized migration.

Cuban migrants
US Customs and Border Safety stated it had stopped Cubans greater than 79,800 occasions from October by means of March [File: Ranu Abhelakh/Reuters]

The assembly additionally occurred only a day after US border authorities reported that the variety of Cubans in search of entry into the nation had doubled from February to March to 32,500 and is now 5 occasions the quantity it was in October.

Experts have said an economic crisis within the nation, worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic, is likely one of the main causes persons are leaving.

“We have now seen, and this I feel underscores the crucial of enterprise these talks, we’ve seen a big improve in irregular migration on part of Cuban migrants coming to america,” Division of State spokesman Ned Value informed reporters on Thursday.

Nonetheless, tensions between Washington and Havana have been growing over different points, as properly, together with the Cuban authorities’s crackdown on protests and persevering with US sanctions towards the Caribbean nation.

Circumstances of what turned referred to as “Havana Syndrome” have been a significant sticking level through the Trump administration, which additionally rolled again the rapprochement between the US and Cuba that had been initiated by former President Barack Obama.

President Joe Biden, who had supported Obama’s efforts whereas serving as his vp, had been anticipated to revive a few of the Obama-era initiatives after he took workplace in January 2021.

However he has but to take action and US restrictions on Cuba stay on the stage to which Trump had restored them. Migration talks between the 2 nations had not been held since 2018.

In the meantime, the Biden administration has been leaning on different regional governments to do extra to cease migrants from reaching the US, most just lately during a visit this week to Panama by Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Homeland Safety Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas.

The summit in Panama City, which included representatives from greater than 20 nations within the Americas area, didn’t embrace Cuba.