What’s in US President Joe Biden’s bipartisan gun violence bill? | Explainer News

New legislation is probably the most sweeping gun violence invoice in many years and follows a spate of mass shootings in the USA.

US President Joe Biden signed into legislation probably the most sweeping gun violence invoice in many years, a bipartisan compromise that appeared unimaginable till a current sequence of mass shootings.

Citing the households of taking pictures victims he met, the president stated: “Their message to us was, ‘Do one thing’. What number of instances did we hear that? ‘Simply do one thing. For God’s sake, simply do one thing.’ Immediately we did.

“It’s time, when it appears not possible to get something completed in Washington, we’re doing one thing consequential.”

Listed here are some highlights of the invoice that Biden signed on Saturday:

Expanded background checks:

  • State and native juvenile and psychological well being information of gun purchasers will likely be a part of federal background checks for patrons age 18 to twenty years.
  • The three-day most for gathering information will likely be lengthened to as much as 10 days to go looking juvenile information.
  • If 10 days lapse and not using a decision, the sale will undergo.

‘Boyfriend loophole’:

  • Convicted home violence offenders will likely be denied weapons if they’ve a present or previous “persevering with critical relationship of a romantic or intimate nature” with a sufferer.
  • An abuser’s proper to purchase firearms will likely be restored after 5 years if no further violent crimes are dedicated.
  • Firearms are at present denied to home abusers if they’re married, reside with or had a baby with a sufferer.

Crimson flag legal guidelines:

  • Federal support will likely be given to the 19 states, plus the District of Columbia, which have legal guidelines serving to authorities get court docket orders to quickly take away weapons from individuals deemed harmful. These states will want sturdy processes for difficult the taking of firearms. Different states might use cash for disaster intervention packages.

Psychological well being:

  • The invoice will increase neighborhood behavioural well being clinics, assist states bolster psychological well being packages in faculties and supply extra psychological well being consultations remotely.

Training:

  • The invoice will enhance spending on faculty psychological well being, disaster intervention, violence prevention packages, psychological well being employee coaching and faculty security.

Federally licensed gun sellers:

  • Present legislation requires that individuals “engaged within the enterprise” of promoting weapons be licensed, which implies they have to conduct background checks. The invoice defines that as promoting firearms ‘‘to predominantly earn a revenue”, in an effort to prosecute individuals who evade that requirement.

Gun traffickers:

  • The invoice will create federal crimes for gun traffickers and “straw purchasers” who purchase weapons for individuals who wouldn’t move background checks.
  • The penalties are as much as 25 years in jail.
  • Such offenders at the moment are primarily prosecuted for paperwork violations.

Price:

  • The nonpartisan Congressional Funds Workplace estimates the price of the invoice at $13 billion, principally for psychological well being and faculties.

What’s at stake as Australia’s Albanese visits Indonesia? | Politics News

Medan, Indonesia – Australia’s Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and Minister for Overseas Affairs Penny Wong are resulting from arrive in Jakarta on Sunday in an indication that the nation’s newly-elected Labor administration needs to breathe new life into Australia’s relationship with its closest neighbour.

There may be hope that Wong specifically, who was born in Malaysia, might be instrumental in ushering in a brand new period of Indonesia – Australia ties.

“To date the alerts look like optimistic, and Penny Wong will take the area significantly,” Ian Wilson, a lecturer in politics and safety research at Murdoch College in Perth, instructed Al Jazeera. “There appears to be actual curiosity in reviving the connection strategically.”

Traditionally, relations between Indonesia and Australia have been blended, with analysts telling Al Jazeera that Labor governments, corresponding to these led by Prime Minister Paul Keating within the early Nineteen Nineties, have often pursued deeper ties with the area than administrations from the Liberal Nationwide coalition underneath prime ministers corresponding to Scott Morrison and Tony Abbott.

“The Indonesia and Australia relationship has blown cold and hot over time,” Athiqah Nur Alami, the pinnacle of the Political Analysis Middle on the Indonesian Nationwide Analysis and Innovation Company (BRIN) instructed Al Jazeera.

“It has been like a rollercoaster, generally you scream and generally you snort.”

What’s deliberate in Indonesia?

Australia’s thirty first prime minister will go to Indonesia June 5-7 and is scheduled to satisfy Indonesian president Joko Widodo, popularly generally known as Jokowi, on June 6.

In a tweet forward of the go to, Albanese mentioned he had spoken to Jokowi on the cellphone and was “wanting ahead to persevering with our discussions in regards to the ongoing partnership between our nations, together with revitalising our commerce relationship”.

The pair are anticipated to debate the Indonesia-Australia Complete Financial Partnership Settlement (IA-CEPA), which was signed in 2020.

Alami says the 2 nations are “neighbours that need to work collectively”, and instructed Al Jazeera that, whereas IA-CEPA is a complete settlement primarily based on 4 pillars of curiosity together with economics, folks, safety and maritime cooperation, “there may be nonetheless room for enchancment”, significantly with reference to commerce.

Albanese is predicted to convey a few of his new ministers with him on the journey, and Wong will meet her Indonesian counterpart Retno Marsudi on Sunday.

At a media briefing in Jakarta on Thursday, the director of East Asia and the Pacific on the Indonesian Ministry of Overseas Affairs, Santo Darmosumarto, mentioned that it had been a convention for newly-installed Australian prime ministers to make Indonesia one among their first abroad visits.

“Plainly Prime Minister Albanese will proceed the custom,” he mentioned.

What’s the present state of relations?

Indonesia is Australia’s largest neighbour, and whereas Jakarta lies greater than 5,000 kilometres (310 miles) west of Canberra, the closest a part of the archipelago is only some hundred kilometres off the tip of Western Australia.

The nation represents “one among Australia’s most essential bilateral relationships”, based on the Australian Authorities Division of Overseas Affairs and Commerce (DFAT), which provides that the 2 nations “take pleasure in in depth cooperation together with on strategic, financial, safety, growth and training points”.

Based on Alami, Albanese’s journey might be seen as a sign that he intends to take the connection significantly. Jokowi himself seems to be dedicated to robust ties with Canberra, visiting Australia 4 occasions since 2014, based on DFAT.

Indonesian president Joko Widodo shakes hands with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison at the Presidential Palace in Jakarta, Indonesia, October 20, 2019.
Indonesian president Joko Widodo shakes arms with then-Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on the Presidential Palace in Jakarta, Indonesia on October 20, 2019 [File: Willy Kurniawan/ Reuters]

Alami says the 2 nations have labored nicely collectively in areas together with maritime safety, navy coaching, and training, however notes that Indonesia trades much less with Australia than its southeast Asian neighbours: Vietnam, Thailand and Malaysia.

“We now have to point out that we’re severe about coming into the market,” she mentioned.

Indonesia can be the chair of the G20 summit this yr, which might be held in Bali in November. Australia might be among the many Asia Pacific nations attending in a yr when there was disagreement over Russia’s involvement on account of its invasion of Ukraine.

“That is one other essential layer of their relationship,” Alami added.

Why have relations been troublesome previously?

Whereas the 2 nations share commerce and safety pursuits, the connection has generally been fraught.

“Beneath the Liberal Nationwide authorities, we noticed diplomatic gaffes and generalised negligence, and a self-serving and clumsy relationship,” Murdoch College’s Wilson mentioned. “Beneath Labor, hopefully we are going to see a giant reset the place we are going to prioritise the connection.”

In 2013, relations soured when plenty of media organisations printed allegations that the Australian Alerts Directorate had tried to observe the personal cellphone calls of the Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, his spouse Kristiani Herwati, and different senior Indonesian officers.

A diplomatic rift between the 2 nations emerged once more in 2015 as Indonesia ready to execute Australian nationals Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan after they have been discovered responsible of masterminding a nine-person drug smuggling ring making an attempt to hold 8.3 kilograms of heroin from the Indonesian island of Bali to Australia in 2005.

The Australian authorities lobbied for the boys’s lives to be spared, with then Prime Minister Tony Abbott referring to the help Australia despatched to Indonesia following the devastating 2004 tsunami – estimated at 1 billion Australian {dollars} ($780m) – and implying that the nation owed Australia for the monetary help.

Then in January 2021, Australia was upset after Indonesia introduced it might free Islamist preacher Abu Bakar Bashir from jail as a result of he had accomplished his jail time period.

Morrison, who was then prime minister, known as the discharge “distressing” for the households of those that had died within the Bali Bombings.

“It’s generally not a good world,” he mentioned.

Bashir was non secular chief of Jemaah Islamiyah, the hardline group behind the 2002 bombings, which killed greater than 200 folks, together with 88 Australians.

May safety issues convey the 2 nations nearer?

In recent times, China has change into more and more assertive within the disputed South China Sea, which it claims nearly in its entirety.

It has additionally been reaching out to Australia’s conventional allies within the Pacific, creating alarm in Canberra, whose ties with Beijing have deteriorated over a raft of points – from its criticisms of China’s crackdowns in Hong Kong and Xinjiang to the origins of the coronavirus pandemic.

Neither Australia nor Indonesia have claims within the South China Sea, however each governments are carefully watching developments there.

The waterway is of strategic and financial significance – one third of the world’s delivery passes by the ocean annually – and Indonesia, as an archipelago, has longstanding issues in regards to the safety of its waters.

China’s declare that the waters across the Natuna Islands, that are in Indonesia’s unique financial zone, are a part of its “conventional fishing grounds” have additionally prompted anger in Jakarta.

Nonetheless, whereas Indonesia and Australia have traditionally discovered frequent floor on plenty of safety points – working collectively on points corresponding to folks smuggling, intelligence cooperation, and counter terrorism – Jakarta is pleased with its lengthy cherished “non-aligned standing” underneath which it has historically sought to navigate a center path with the world’s bigger powers.

It has already indicated – regardless of strain from different members of the grouping – that it’ll invite Russian President Vladimir Putin to the G20 Summit regardless of the invasion of Ukraine. To placate its critics, Jakarta has additionally prolonged an invite to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy who has indicated that he’ll attend by way of video hyperlink.

Some consider Indonesia’s method might be an asset for Canberra.

“Indonesia can assist to mitigate militarisation and sabre-rattling between China and Australia,” mentioned Wilson.

Variations over tips on how to method China’s rising energy have already prompted some friction.

Final September, tensions flared after Australia, the UK, and the US introduced a trilateral safety settlement generally known as AUKUS, underneath which Australia would purchase nuclear-powered submarines.

Jakarta was one among plenty of nations that expressed concern in regards to the deal, and Morrison’s deliberate go to to Jakarta was cancelled.

When Widodo and Morrison did lastly meet – at a digital assembly with leaders of the Affiliation of Southeast Asian Nations – the Indonesian president “repeatedly and forcefully” raised issues in regards to the AUKUS deal, based on Australian media.

The Indonesian Ministry of Overseas Affairs additionally chided Australia for what it termed “a seamless arms race” within the area.

When requested on Thursday if AUKUS could be mentioned throughout Albanese’s go to, the international ministry’s Darmosumarto mentioned that Indonesia is aiming to diversify its relationship with Australia by specializing in completely different matters to these raised beforehand.

“Indonesia sees that the dimension of cooperation with Australia, which beforehand targeted on defence and safety, has now lined different points, together with financial cooperation and people-to-people relations, which seem to dominate cooperation between the 2 nations,” he mentioned.

What about cultural and academic ties?

Within the Eighties and Nineteen Nineties, Bahasa Indonesia was extra extensively taught in Australian faculties and universities.

However in newer many years, fewer Australians have been studying the language.

“This go to is a very good factor to cement within the cultural psyche the significance of the Indonesia-Australian relationship. The truth that this go to is the primary [official trip overseas as Prime Minister] shouldn’t be neglected,” Liam Prince, the director of the Australian Consortium for “In-Nation” Indonesian Research (ACICIS) instructed Al Jazeera. Albanese’s first journey abroad to the Quad Summit in Tokyo had been deliberate by the earlier authorities.

“I’m professionally hopeful. There may be a variety of optimism and dreaming of what might be.”

Based on DFAT, the Australia Awards programme has offered greater than 11,500 scholarships to Indonesians to review at a tertiary stage in Australia since 1953, with greater than 17,000 Indonesians finding out in Australian establishments in 2020.

Alami, nonetheless, who accomplished her postgraduate research in Canberra, mentioned that whereas Indonesians see Australia as an excellent place to review on account of its beneficiant scholarship alternatives, Australian college students might not really feel as keen about Indonesia.

“Indonesia is without doubt one of the largest democracies on the earth, however some Australians don’t even know that it’s a democratic nation,” she mentioned.

Nonetheless, Indonesia stays probably the most widespread locations for college kids underneath the New Colombo Plan – an Australian authorities initiative to encourage younger Australians to review and undertake internships within the Asia Pacific area. Since 2014, greater than 10,700 scholarships and grants for college kids to review and luxuriate in work-based expertise in Indonesia have been awarded, based on DFAT.

Prince says that if he had a “wish-list” concerning instructional ties between Indonesia and Australia underneath the brand new Labor authorities, it might be to take care of the New Colombo and scale it up, whereas additionally offering funding for instructing Indonesian at a college stage in Australia.

“Something that elevates the general public discourse will assist the general public curiosity in Indonesia and Indonesian language programmes,” he mentioned of Albanese’s go to to Jakarta.

What’s behind Sinn Fein’s victory in Northern Ireland? | Politics

Video Length 24 minutes 40 seconds

From: Inside Story

For the primary time, Sinn Fein has received probably the most seats in Northern Eire’s meeting.

The political panorama in Northern Eire has modified.

For the primary time, Sinn Fein, which desires to unite all of Eire, has received probably the most seats in regional elections.

That’s put an finish to a century of dominance by Unionists, who assist the British Crown and structure.

Now each side have to conform to kind a brand new authorities.

However would they agree?

And what does it imply for the way forward for the UK?

Presenter: Nastasya Tay

Visitors:

Duncan Morrow – Professor of politics at Ulster College

Nicholas Whyte – Worldwide affairs strategist and senior director in Brussels for APCO

Graham Gudgin – Analysis affiliate on the College of Cambridge and a former particular adviser to First Minister David Trimble within the Northern Eire Meeting

What’s the way out of Sri Lanka’s economic crisis? | Politics

Video Period 24 minutes 15 seconds

From: Inside Story

President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has declared one other state of emergency. 

The island nation of Sri Lanka is in disaster. There have been meals and gasoline shortages for weeks and energy cuts have turn into the brand new norm.

Many say they’re struggling to get by and so they blame the federal government for mishandling the financial state of affairs – calling on President Gotabya Rajapaksa to resign.

There was a common strike on Friday that shut down a lot of the nation.

In response, the president’s workplace re-imposed a state of emergency – saying it was wanted to “guarantee public order”.

However what introduced the nation to this unprecedented state of affairs?

Presenter: Adrian Finighan

Visitors:

Bhavani Fonseka – Senior researcher and lawyer with the Centre for Coverage Options

Ahilan Kadirgamar – Political economist and senior lecturer on the College of Jaffna

Jehan Perera – Govt director of the Nationwide Peace Council of Sri Lanka

What’s the way out of Sri Lanka’s economic crisis? | Business and Economy

From: Counting the Cost

Sri Lanka’s finance minister has made a request for a Fast Financing Instrument with the IMF. What are the probabilities for a bailout?

Sri Lanka’s coffers have all however dried up and it can not afford to pay for imports.

Thousands and thousands of its persons are bearing the brunt of the nation’s financial disaster. Primary items are briefly provide, energy cuts are frequent, costs are hovering and the worth of incomes is eroding.

Many individuals are blaming the president for the worst financial disaster in additional than 70 years and so they have taken to the streets to demand he step down.

Elsewhere, China’s GDP development for the primary quarter beats forecasts, however will it obtain the 5.5 p.c development goal for 2022?